Friday 2019

Friday 29th of November
De Samenwerking De Visie De Uitdaging Het Inzicht De Interactie De Vernieuwing
08:00 Registration & Coffee
09:00 Welcome
09:30  Agile Leadership – A look inside pandoras box

Ron Eringa


The link to the session pdf can be found on the Scrum Day London website

 Turns out we’ve been doing retrospectives all wrong.

Stijn Decneut
&
Geert De Cang

Max: 50 
 We choose conflict over peace

Marjoke Franken

Max: 50 
 Mob Programming Workshop

Michel Grootjans

Max: 15 
 Crunching ‘real-life stories’ with DDD EventStorming and combining it with BDD Example Mapping

Kenny Baas-Schwegler
&
João Rosa

Max: 30 
 Cooking the best experience through empathy

Jord Rengerve

Max: 20 

slides allowed to guide through the workshop steps

10:30  Back to Trunk – Extreme Continuous Delivery

Mykola Gurov

Turns out we’ve been doing retrospectives all wrong.CONTINUED We choose conflict over peaceCONTINUED Mob Programming WorkshopCONTINUED Crunching ‘real-life stories’ with DDD EventStorming and combining it with BDD Example MappingCONTINUED Cooking the best experience through empathyCONTINUED
11:00 Coffee Break
11:30  No hassle during your Organizational change? Create it yourself!

Ruud Rietveld
&
Joanne Boerstoel

Max: 40 
 9 ways to effectively achieve change without use of power

Karen De Boeck
&
[email protected]

Max: 45 

We will use 9 self-made drawings in A3 format and put them on the floor in a kind of matrix+ 1 poster on a flipchart (no ppt)

We choose conflict over peaceCONTINUED  A flat organization structure? This is how we do it at Sweet Mustard

Jan Sem
&
[email protected]

Crunching ‘real-life stories’ with DDD EventStorming and combining it with BDD Example MappingCONTINUED  #NoEstimates or #BetterForcasting?

Marcel Blok

12:00 No hassle during your Organizational change? Create it yourself!CONTINUED 9 ways to effectively achieve change without use of powerCONTINUED We choose conflict over peaceCONTINUED  Bottleneck heroes

Sandra Warmolts

Crunching ‘real-life stories’ with DDD EventStorming and combining it with BDD Example MappingCONTINUED #NoEstimates or #BetterForcasting?CONTINUED
12:30 Lunch
13:30 Plenary session
14:00  Agile decision making

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
&
Dette van Zeeland

 “Oh my god, not this again!”

Christiaan Verwijs
&
William Water

Max: 50 
 The most important skill!

Dajo Breddels

 What can Antifragility do for your work, for your organisation and for you?

Jan de Vries

Max: 100 
 Architectural katas to practice discussing about architecture with your team

Nelis Boucké
&
Matteo Pierro

Max: 50 
 Dreaming of a fully aligned multi-team environment ?

Stefan Vanlokeren
&
Jurgen Maus

Max: 24 
15:30 Coffee Break
16:00  Liberate Your Scrum Events!

Evelien Acun-Roos
&
Laurens Bonnema

Max: 72 

First rough-cut of the presentation and workshop as tried out at an OpenKitchen recently.

 Create your own agile manifesto

Yves Hanoulle
&
Nele Van Beveren

Max: 40 
 The ultimate collaboration mindset

Siemen Bastiaens

Max: 40 
 Dataviz for Agile practitioners

Koen De keersmaecker

 DDD from a trench

Jeroen Tiebout

 The value of budget in a multi project context

Jan De Baere

17:00 Closing
17:30 Drinks at the bar (sponsored by TMC Agile)
Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro’s and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Agile Leadership – A look inside pandoras box

Experience the shift in leadership that is required for Agile teams

Ron Eringa

In this session you will discover:

How the responsibilities of the traditional manager role changes, once Agile teams become more mature?

How the role of the Agile Leader relates to the roles in Scrum?

What challenges an Agile Leader will face to make Agile teams successful?

Goal of the session: You will walk away from this session with some practical tips to start with as an Agile Leader.
Intended audience: Anyone involved with Agile teams
Expected experience: Some basic knowledge on Agility or Scrum
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Materials: The link to the session pdf can be found on the Scrum Day London website
Did you ever try to install the latest version of Office365 to a computer that runs on Windows XP?

Most people will know that this is a heroic quest that will probably lead to some disappointment.

However, many organizations are trying to accomplish something similar with their Agile and Scrum implementation: they adopt a set of models, frameworks and practices on an operating system that is not ready for it.

Most of the organizations do not even get half of the potential of the Agile teams, because they never considered that an update of their leadership model\operating system was a precondition to make those teams successful.

In this session I will be using a number of interactive exercises and thought-provoking statements to deal with the following topics:

How to update the operating system for the Agile Leader and what could be missing in the old one?

What are the paradigm shifts we need to make as Leaders in order to make Agile succeed?

What are the first steps that we can make as Leaders to make sure that we can create the most fertile soil for Agile teams to grow?

What Organizational\Human Design Systems we are using to design a Learning Path for the Agile Leader?

How do these Systems link to the context of an Agile team?

How you can start using these ideas as a Leader in the Agile transformation?

These exercises will trigger you to think more from the perspective from a more traditional leader who struggles with adopting the new Agile mindset.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
50

Turns out we’ve been doing retrospectives all wrong.

Better listen to what Social Neuroscientists have to say before you walk into your next retrospective.

Stijn Decneut
& Geert De Cang

A thought-provoking session where we share what Social Neuroscientists have to say about some of our retrospective practices. We’ll start with your experience and we’ll bring findings from cool research on social behaviour.
Goal of the session: Inspiration for hosting (even) better retrospectives.
Session Type: 90 min discovery session
Yes, we have seen incredibly successful retrospectives, where teams courageously worked on their Individuals & Interactions, relentlessly experimenting with ways to improve their collaboration and self-organization.

But all too often we experienced teams getting stuck in superficial discussions on their Processes & Tools, like the configuration of JIRA and the format of the User Stories. For whatever reason, despite the best of their intentions, those teams seemed unable to establish a really safe environment to get personal with healthy criticism, productive disagreement, deep learning and courageous experimenting.

Instead of blaming this on “a lack of support from management” or “the immaturity of the teams”, we wanted to get to the bottom of this. We discovered that there’s a really cool area in science -Social Neuroscience- where researchers have been discovering more and more about how we learn in teams, what really motivates us, and how we establish new habits that last.

We were blown away by what they have discovered. We learned that several of our favourite practices were doomed to fail from the beginning. In this session we will share some of these discoveries with you through small experiments and fun anecdotes, and we’ll give you some spicy food for thought before you prepare your next retrospective.

Back to program


max
50

We choose conflict over peace

In our communications we invite exactly that kind of behavior that we hoped to avoid.

Marjoke Franken

A large part of this workshop is based on the bestselling book of the Arbinger Institute: the anatomy of Peace. The Anatomy of Peace asks: What if conflicts at home, conflicts at work, and conflicts in the world stem from the same root cause? What if we systematically misunderstand that cause? And what if, as a result, we unwittingly perpetuate the very problems we think we are trying to solve?

Discover how we tent to go on and on in circles of conflict inviting behavior and learn how to approach conflict in a completely different manner and learn how to grow trust at the same time!

This workshop is part of the expert program with the Semco Style Institute

Goal of the session: After this session you are able to recognize behavior in yourself and others that invites just that kind of behavior we’d hope to avoid. It gives insight in our intentions and behaviors, and you are more able to engage in constructive conflict and grow trust more rapidly.
Intended audience: Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: 0
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session
How is it, that in the way we communicate, we see people behave exactly they way we did not want them to behave?

It is because we invite exactly the kind of behavior we hoped to avoid, thus nurturing the conflicts we are in!

In an interactive workshop I invite you to introspect yourself in your interactions with others, helping you to get some insights in the way we maintain conflicts rather than resolving them. I also help you find a way out of this circle, changing the way you look at people and, more importantly, the way you look at yourself!

You will discover what dynamic is behind trust and the absence of trust and you will learn how to influence the level of trust between people.

After this workshop you will be better equipped to create trust in your surroundings and you are able to convert quarrels into constructive conflict!

In this workshop I combine the work of the Arbinger Institute, Christopher Avery and Patrick Lencioni.

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
15

Mob Programming Workshop

A gentle introduction to a highly collaborative way of working

Michel Grootjans

All the brilliant people working on the same thing, at the same time, in the same space, and on the same computer.

Are you interested, curious or doubtful about this practice, then this session is for you. We’ll try mob programming out together and challenge the ideas behind it. We will be working on a small constrained problem, and we’ll try to solve it together.

Goal of the session: An understanding that this form of collaboration is not as controversial as it seems
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Vincent, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 90 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Everyone is welcome. A mob programming team is a mix between developers, testers, analysts and any other skill necessary to go from idea to production. They collaborate on all aspects of the work such as refining product increments, design, implementation, testing, deployment, and working with the customer and business experts. The goal is to maximise shared understanding by applying single-piece workflow.

This workshop is divided into a few parts:

– a short introduction to mob programming

– practice, practice, practice. Depending on the audience, we’ll code a simple kata in java, C# or javascript. Everyone will get a chance to get their hands at the keyboard. If you’re not comfortable participating, observers are welcome too.

– evaluation

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Crunching ‘real-life stories’ with DDD EventStorming and combining it with BDD Example Mapping

Kenny Baas-Schwegler
& João Rosa

‘It is not the domain expert’s knowledge that goes into production; it is the developer’s assumption of that knowledge that goes into production’

Experience how EventStorming and Example Mapping help you create a shared language between business and IT that will drive your software modelling, building and testing. Eventually really building the right thing for your customers!

Goal of the session: How you can combine different visual meeting styles to quickly iterate over models and requirements and see if they work.
Intended audience: everyone
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
The way agile software teams gain knowledge about what to build is either by the product owner or business analyst serving as a proxy to domain knowledge. Domain knowledge usually ends up as second-hand news in either functional design documents or as user stories in some scrum tools like Jira. Second-hand knowledge is a significant risk when building software. Each time information is transferred just like doing the telephone game, the story is changed, and people make assumptions. Because as Alberto Brandolini said: ‘It is not the domain expert’s knowledge that goes into production; it is the developer’s assumption of that knowledge that goes into production’.

To really understand what our users will need, we want to have a first-hand experience from ‘real-life stories’ before we can model and create our software. While both the DDD and BDD techniques emphasis on ‘real-life stories’ by doing visual collaborative modelling, they both focus on different goals. DDD focuses more on creating bounded contexts in which a single model is created, BDD focuses more on different scenarios and can create executable specifications as an outcome. By doing EventStorming and using techniques from BDD such as Example Mapping, we can create more insights. We can simultaneously create a model and executable specifications for our user needs. This way, we can write software and tests which matches the shared understanding of the user, creating a ubiquitous language. Value will be shipped at a faster pace.

In this hands-on session, we start with EventStorming for software design, slowly gaining domain knowledge of what we need to build. By switching to Example Mapping we get more insights into our domain. Eventually we can end up designing a model for our domain with out formalised scenarios to test them. You will experience how EventStorming and Example Mapping you can create a shared language between business and IT that will drive your software modelling, building and testing.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
20

Cooking the best experience through empathy

Learn how to design experiences based on customer motivation

Jord Rengerve

Learn how to create a value proposition and customer journey from the motivations and emotions of your customers. Build a product that fits your customers’s emotions. We’ll start by creating an empathy map focused on motivation. We will then map the customer journey with a focus on emotions. As a use case, we’ll focus on the experience of a single father who wants to cook for his kid’s birthday.
Goal of the session: innovation tools
Intended audience: Marieke Leo Bram Georges Vincent Joke Ellen
Expected experience: 2
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
Materials: slides allowed to guide through the workshop steps
From an empathy mapping exercise that focuses on motivation, you will build an experience that addresses your customers’ emotions.

You will be responsible for designing a cooking experience for a single father who wants to impress other parents at his kid’s birthday. You will first use the Management 3.0 moving motivators inside an empathy map, to understand the motivations and frustrations of this father. Then, you will use the findings of this empathy map to define a customer journey. At the end of the workshop, you will share how you plan to deliver the experience and surprise others with innovative ideas!

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Back to Trunk – Extreme Continuous Delivery

Mykola Gurov

Deploy continuously, move faster. But why? Won’t things break? What are the benefits for the teams and their stakeholders? Do those also apply to the “deep” back-end systems?

Here at bol.com, we enjoy lots of team autonomy. We can press the “deploy” button at any moment. Theoretically. Practically, there are non-technical obstacles, like: “testing in progress on staging, the rest of the changes must wait.” Every delay adds up to the focus loss, and the pile of undelivered risks is growing fast with every commit.

Let’s take a look at the use case of a team that decided to keep its master synced with production. What were the obstacles in the team behavior, testing, monitoring releases? What were the benefits discovered? And whether the business noticed improvements in the idea-to-value velocity?

Goal of the session: Observe the benefits of decreasing divergence between development branches, trunk (master of git) and production
Expected experience: intermediate +
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
Most of us will agree that fast deployments and short release cycles are good. But how fast is fast? And what’s in pushing the development process to the extremities of the continuously delivered trunk-based development?

In this case study, we’ll follow the experience of a team that started at a fairly decent position (regular releases, solid engineering practices). A number of minor annoyances (stampede at testing environments, hotfix management) led us to aim at the simple goal of keeping the master continuously in sync with production.

Even though we had the platform tools necessary – the “Deploy” button and the right to execute it, the goal appeared to be surprisingly difficult at first, especially at the human behavior department and testing. Eventually, we found a key to our situation by introducing a “non-compromised master” policy: every commit in master (a.k.a. trunk) may be delivered to production without the prior consent of the rest of the team.

This simple trick changed the team’s way of working overnight. Suddenly, putting any change behind a feature toggle ceased to be optional. It wasn’t anymore OK to leave a new feature soaking up acceptance testing while blocking the rest of the deliveries.

Benefits started to show up quickly. The cognitive overload of keeping up with differences between branches quickly evaporated. There were no more discussions on planning and replanning the feature deliveries in regards to their testing times. A feature was done when fully delivered to production including post-release cleanup, no waiting time, no compromises. Increasing delivery pace promptly highlighted and stimulated solving the deficiencies of non-resilient systems and end-to-end testing. Eventually, we could build and test features continuously on production.

The team ended up with the process that was much lighter, cheaper and more fun to follow. The quality of the product has increased significantly. Still, the business impact remained limited, much to my surprise, I’d like to reflect upon as well.

Back to program


max
40

No hassle during your Organizational change? Create it yourself!

Hassle in a transition will help you to understand what is not addressed yet.

Ruud Rietveld
& Joanne Boerstoel

Are you currently in an organizational transition? (probably from some way of working to an Agile way of working)

Do you experience hassle, or opposition, or just plain stupidness?

You should come to our session. It might help. We have a session about Systemic Transition Management, and we will practice with a tool that will help anyone experiencing an irritating inconvenience in his current transition. The session will also help answer the question in title.

Goal of the session: More insight in ‘bad’ stuff happening during transitions: why is there a hassle, what is the purpose of it and how to use it to your advantage.
Intended audience: Marieke, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Ellen
Expected experience: some experience with organizational transitions
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
A lot of organizational transition (and us Agile change agents are almost always in one) are failing, some faster, some later. Often when it seems to go well it suddenly collapses. How come?

There is the ‘official stuff’, like changed roles, responsibilities, workflows, etc. Then there is also the unofficial stuff, the way people react, the emotions, the hassle: this is the so-called undercurrent. This session is about that undercurrent, and how you can manage it to have better chances at a successful transition.

In the session we will touch the 5 phases of systemic transition management, see what happens where and when and why. We will practice with a tool that will help anyone experiencing an irritating inconvenience in his or her current transition.

It will be highly interactive because we don’t like boring sessions.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
45

9 ways to effectively achieve change without use of power

Applicable to individual, team and organisational changes

Karen De Boeck
& [email protected]

Ever experienced the adverse effect of convincing people to change their behaviour, of managing resistance, and of imposing a change?

If yes, it will be a revelation to discover and experience 9 techniques, based on scientific studies and remarkable cases. Apparently simple. With great results. Hands-on.

Be surprised that in this short time, you will learn techniques, apply them on your own change project, be challenged, reflect, … and end up with a set of valuable and concrete steps to boost the change you are in.

You learn and practice to address people’s motivation (the elephant), peoples rationale (the rider), and smoothening out the path.

Goal of the session: Participants will look differently to the concept of behavioural change, and will be armed to have impact on the change of their own environment (personal and professional), without use of power.
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen, Marieke
Expected experience: no experience needed; also experienced change coaches will get a lot out of the session
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Materials: We will use 9 self-made drawings in A3 format and put them on the floor in a kind of matrix+ 1 poster on a flipchart (no ppt)
Hands-on experience of an incremental and iterative approach on Change.

If you expect that we will make change easy, we won’t. If you expect to learn about how to convince people, deal with resistance and plan the change ahead, you won’t.

We want the change to come from within people. We will propose and let you experience a fully effective set of strategies that are simple and flexible enough to use in different situations – individually, family, work, community or other.

Be surprised that in this short time, you will learn techniques, apply them on your own change project, be challenged, reflect, … and end up with a set of valuable and concrete steps to boost the change you are in.

Reaction by previous participants: ‘if we start reflecting in this way, change will be effective and sustainable!’.

The model we use is ‘Switch’ of Chip&Dan Heath. The interactive and reflective workshop format is part of is inspired by ‘Teamleren’ of L. Dorlandt and R-A Collaris and included in ‘TeamGrowing’.

We use no slides. 9 visuals on the floor facilitate experience the different approaches. We apply it on at least one real live case brought in by the participants, and let you experience how you can apply this approach in intervisions.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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A flat organization structure? This is how we do it at Sweet Mustard

Jan Sem
& [email protected]

Agile, teal, self-organising, autonomous teams, flat organisations, new way of working… We all dream to work in such an environment. The question is; how do you create such an open, transparent structure where you don’t lose focus, nor efficiency.
Goal of the session: Inspiration
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Georges, Vincent, Ellen
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Agile, teal, self-organising, autonomous teams, flat organisations, new way of working… We all dream to work in such an environment. The question is; how do you create such an open, transparent structure where you don’t lose focus, nor efficiency.

Sweet Mustard?

Sweet Mustard is enabling agile teams to work in state-of-the-art technologies for its customers

Sweet Mustard is almost 2 years old

The pillars of Sweet Mustard are

-Cultivating talent

-Inspiring community

-Innovating business

There’s no management team or hierarchy

The goal

In the beginning, while working with 2 or 5 or even 10 colleagues, everything seemed manageable. Of course, when a company grows as fast as Sweet Mustard in 2 year’s time, some obvious growing pains emerge. While being happy about boosting business and rising demands, questions like “how can we keep the right focus and priorities, how do we safeguard our values and core beliefs, how do we continue to work on our pillars and our story” arise.

What we were looking for

Agile, teal, self-organising, autonomous teams, flat organisations, new way of working…

Exactly that. We wanted to keep the feeling of “not coming to work” when we were coming to work. Still having fun with innovating ideas, hackathons, no fixed place or time for work, no managers, planners to tell us what or how to do things.

This is the story of how we set up our flat organization structure

Read more on https://www.sweetmustard.be/seeds/A-flat-organisation-structure/

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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#NoEstimates or #BetterForcasting?

Marcel Blok

Always hated estimates? Are estimates always a discussion in your team? Do you seem to be wrong all the time? Then you might be ready to start discovering alternatives and start learning what you will actually need them for!
Goal of the session: Becoming more aware on different estimation and forecasting techniques.
Intended audience: Marieke learns new estimation techniques, Leo renews his knowledge, and picks up some new ideas, Bram likes the discussions in this session, Philippe is surprised that there are alternatives to what he always did. Both Georges and Vincent learn some ways to get more grip on their deadlines. Hank and Ellen may pick up some new techniques to start using the next day and bring back some joy in estimation.
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Estimates. Why do we use them? Why do we need them?

Many of us have a love-hate relationship with estimates. We know we can’t make correct estimates, but we do understand the need of them.

In this interactive session we will explore the use of estimates and how they are just a means to get a forecast. We will have a look at the nature of work in the complex domain and how this effects estimation. And we will discover alternatives to estimations. Finally we will try to figure out which techniques may be best suited for which uses.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Bottleneck heroes

How your heroes become your bottlenecks and what to do about it

Sandra Warmolts

A real-life story about a growing company where the heroes became the bottlenecks for expanding, how they were included in the teams to have old and new heroes working together, make use of all the knowledge and history and started growing again.
Goal of the session: Don’t throw away your company’s history and knowledge, let old en new heroes work together and know how
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
What if your company has grown over the years, maybe decades, with a select group of people who have been in the lead for customer contact, innovation, new architectures and know all the details and history of your company and your products. Let’s call them your heroes.

All new initiatives, new product ideas, new markets, new architects, new features maybe even changes to features will need to be discussed and covered by your heroes, because they know it all.

Since your company is growing, they work 50 hours a week, sometimes even 60, to keep up with their role and status. And then 60 hours might not be enough anymore and they will become your bottlenecks. It’s slowing down everything. Teams are waiting for work and the backlog for your heroes explodes.

Time to change !

Teams will be involved in new initiatives, new product ideas, new markets, new architects, new features, changes to features. But how will your new heroes, the teams, work with the old heroes in a new structure where you can grow again, without losing the knowledge, the history.

A real-life story, that comes with letting go, saying thank you, picking up, sharing, bending and creating an environment where is room for old and new heroes and how they find each other.

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Agile decision making

How to facilitate decision making in teams?

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
& Dette van Zeeland

You’re invited to learn about patterns to facilitate co-creation and decision-making. How can we guide people, teams, organisations to more effective collaboration, without imposing heavy-weight frameworks? How do we put in place the agile and lean principles we stand for and care about that much? Create a safe environment and invite people for co-creation and agile decision-making! Facilitate the process of making decisions, resolving objections, in a sociocratic way. In this session you’ll learn the concepts and we’ll practice consent decision making with some participants inside a fishbowl. This session is an experiential session, the goal of the session is to let you experience and practice!
Goal of the session: After attending the session, the participant will know the difference between different forms of decision making (such as consensus and consent), so that he/she is aware about the advantages/disadvantagesAfter attending the session, the participant will know patterns of decision making, resolving objections, so that he/she can experiment with this in his/her own context
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
You’re invited to learn about patterns to facilitate co-creation and decision-making. How can we guide people, teams, organisations to more effective collaboration, without imposing heavy-weight frameworks? How do we put in place the agile and lean principles we stand for and care about that much? Create a safe environment and invite people for co-creation and agile decision-making! Facilitate the process of  making decisions, resolving objections, in a sociocratic way. In this session you’ll learn the concepts and we’ll practice consent decision making with some participants inside a fishbowl. This session is an experiential session, the goal of the session is to let you experience and practice!

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50

“Oh my god, not this again!”

How to engage and motivate other developers in your team to try new things and improve their skills

Christiaan Verwijs
& William Water

This workshop is about engaging with, and bringing other developers in your team along in overcoming their resistance to try new things and improve their craft. Using our combined experience, we will share and uncover strategies for creating ‘awesome developer’-cultures. The outcome of this workshop is a list of 10 specific, easy-to-apply, co-created strategies & practices that can you use to better engage developers in your team.
Goal of the session: Practical tips and simple strategies for creating awesome developer cultures – within your team and broader organisation.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Hank
Expected experience: Make sure you are either a member of a Development Team or a developer eager to ignite your co-developers.
Session Type: 90 min discovery session
Check out this video where we pitch our workshop: https://youtu.be/LZe65N67gtw

Every Development Team has at least one of them. A happy, enthusiastic developer who is eager to try out ‘new’ things – like Docker, swarming, micro-services, automated testing or the latest Angular – and is excited to improve her/his craftsmanship by reading books, blogs and watching videos. But the rest of the team? Not so much. They feel more comfortable doing what they’ve always done. And there’s no time to try new things anyways. ‘Oh my god, not this again’ is a common response to your new ideas.

Now what?

This workshop is intended for developers who recognize themselves in this. I know I do – a developer in my team once picked ‘ohmygodnotthisagain’ as a username in Bitbucket because he didn’t want to move away from Subversion.

Trying new things, moving to new technologies and improving your craft can be scary. It also takes time. But without good development practices, all this talk about Scrum and Agile is pointless. So we need to find ways to help other developers find motivation to grow and develop themselves. And we need to find the time to do so.

This workshop is about engaging with, and bringing other developers in your team along in overcoming their resistance to try new things and improve their craft. Using our combined experience, we will share and uncover strategies for creating ‘awesome developer’-cultures.

This session is hosted by Christiaan Verwijs and William Water. Both of them played a vital role in creating and shaping the excellent developer culture at HROffice (formerly known as NowOnline). Both in terms of coding quality, craftsmanship and collaboration, the three Scrum Teams at this company are capable of building and delivering excellent products.

P.s. the developer with the username ‘ohmygodnotthisagain’ is now an excellent developer 🙂

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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The most important skill!

Dealing with uncertainty

Dajo Breddels

It doesn’t matter if you’re a programmer, tester or CEO, what most people have in common is that they really dislike uncertainty.

In this session we’ll dive deep in this phenomenon. My goal is to provide you with the tools so that you can help other people who struggle with this. Not only to let them be ok with uncertainty but to thrive in uncertainty

Goal of the session: You will get tools to help people to thrive in uncertainty
Expected experience: experienced uncertainty somewhere in your life
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
It doesn’t matter if you’re a programmer, tester or CEO, what most people have in common is that they really dislike uncertainty.

The standard approach is: “Give me something certain!”

This “certainty” comes in many forms:

– Estimations

– Processess

– Maturity Models

– 2×2 Matrix

– KPI’s and OKR’s

– etc.

But living in a VUCA world it’s better to coach them to be ok with uncertainty, instead of giving people false certainty.

In this session we’ll dive deep in this phenomenon. My goal is to provide you with the tools so that you can help other people who struggle with this. Not only to let them be ok with uncertainty but to thrive in uncertainty

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100

What can Antifragility do for your work, for your organisation and for you?

About unleashing hidden forces

Jan de Vries

Have you ever wondered why DevOps, Continuous Deployment and the Chaos Monkey work so well? Why it works at all? And why software projects, silo’s and top down management don’t? These and other concepts have one thing in common. They are affected by a hidden force: antifragility.

In this discovery session Jan de Vries will share the basics of Antifragility and will invite you to discover more areas of application. In your work, your organisation and in your life. Because antifragility is everywhere.

Goal of the session: To look at their work, their organisation and their life from a different perspective
Intended audience: not limited to specific personas
Expected experience: no experience with Antifragility required
Session Type: 90 min discovery session
In this discovery session Jan de Vries will share the basics of Antifragility by explaining three aspects of asymmetry:

– nonlinearity. Anything that has more upside than downside from random events / shocks is antifragile; the reverse is fragile. Risk management is in most cases risk theatre. It is smarter to focus on increasing your antifragility. Here is a relationship with continuous deployment and software projects.

– optionality. An option is a contract which gives someone the right, but NOT the obligation, to do something. Financial options are usually expensive. Non-financial options are usually free or cheap but…. we don’t recognise them. Here is a relationship with MVP’s and technical debt.

– transferring fragility. if one party has the downside and another party has the upside, fragility is being transferred from one party to another. The reverse is skin in the game which means that a person has something to lose in a given situation. Here is a relationship with DevOps.

After explaining these basics Jan de Vries will invite you to discover more areas of application, to detect the interfaces between XP and Antifragility, to realise the power of Via Negativa (another Antifragile concept) and to draw up an action list that can be carried out immediately. You will be able to use the same format in your own project right away.

It will be like turning on the light in a room where you always navigated by touch

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50

Architectural katas to practice discussing about architecture with your team

Learn how you can have architectural discussions with the whole team in a simple way

Nelis Boucké
& Matteo Pierro

Learn how you can use architcture to your advantage in an agile team.
Goal of the session: Learn how to architect in a self-organising team
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Affinity with software development will help to understand the discussions
Session Type: 90 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
With the rise of agile, architecture has disappeared a bit in the background or co-existed in an ivory tower (boring documents or powerpoints that everyone ignores).

Yet, having a good architecture can make or break your product. So it becomes key that your teams can leverage all the knowledge and learns to discuss about architecture!

The goal of this session is to let participants taste two techniques simple and team oriented techniques that can help self-organizing teams to work with architecture: Architectural Katas as a way to discuss about architecture and the C4 to describe an architecture. Both techniques are simple and understandable by anyone with affinity to development, but often not well known or practiced.

The Architectural Katas were born out of a simple desire: team members need a chance to practice architecting. Inspired by the idea of Dave Thomas using the concept of “Code Kata”, Ted Neward came up with the idea to of running Code katas at a higher level, and the idea of Architectural Katas was born.

The C4 model was created by Simon Brown as a way to help software development teams to discuss and describe the static structure of your software architecture. It’s a way to create maps of your code, at various levels of detail, in the same way you would use something like Google Maps to zoom in and out of an area you are interested in.

In this session we are going to fuse both techniques and do an architectural kata with the C4 model. The main goal is not to get to a perfect architecture, but rather share with the participants how they could run/facilitate these types of sessions and architectural discussions themselves with their team.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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24

Dreaming of a fully aligned multi-team environment ?

Simulation game of a 3-step approach to align on priorities, scope & delivery forecast

Stefan Vanlokeren
& Jurgen Maus

“Plans are worthless, but planning is everything” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
Intended audience: Marieke, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Working in a world full of misalignments, misunderstandings & flawed input is a plus.
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
The story begins with teams chasing their own, separate goals, ignoring each others’ talents & forgetting to make their customers happy.

Join our experience of writing the next chapter. You will be drowned, as a member of one of the teams, in a new world of inspiring collaboration via an interactive & fun simulation game.

Feel how experimenting with a 3-step alignment on priorities, scope & delivery forecast can lead to pursuing a common dream … and what about the chapter thereafter ?

Required Experience: Working in a world full of misalignments, misunderstandings & flawed input is a plus.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
72

Liberate Your Scrum Events!

Explore the power of Liberating Structures in your Scrum Events

Evelien Acun-Roos
& Laurens Bonnema

Do your Scrum Events feel like they could use a boost? Do they suffer from one-way communication with little or no interaction or engagement? Are participants disconnected? Does it feel as if only the Scrum Master is not bored?

Explore how to boost your Scrum Events and make them more interesting, engaging and active through Liberating Structures in this short presentation followed by a high-intensity workshop. You’ll walk out of this workshop armed with the 7 Liberating Structures for highly effective Scrum Events, ready to give them a boost!

Goal of the session: Learn about Liberating Structures and how to apply them to boost your Scrum Events
Intended audience: Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters, Development Team members
Expected experience: All
Session Type: 90 min discovery session
Materials: First rough-cut of the presentation and workshop as tried out at an OpenKitchen recently.
Do your Scrum Events feel like they could use a boost? Do they suffer from one-way communication with little or no interaction or engagement? Are participants disconnected? Does it feel as if only the Scrum Master is not bored? We see this all too often. And it makes us sad. It is entirely avoidable. Whether you are a Scrum Master, a Development Team member or a Product Owner, you can liberate your Scrum Events from the template-zombie apocalypse through effective use of Liberating Structures!

Explore how to boost your Scrum Events and make them more interesting, engaging and active through Liberating Structures in this short presentation followed by a high-intensity workshop. According to their inventors, Keith McCandless and Henri LIpmanowicz, Liberating Structures are easy-to-learn microstructures that enhance relational coordination and trust. They quickly foster lively participation in groups of any size, making it possible to truly include and unleash everyone. Liberating Structures are a disruptive innovation that can replace more controlling or constraining approaches.

You’ll walk out of this workshop armed with the 7 Liberating Structures for highly effective Scrum Events, ready to give them a boost!

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40

Create your own agile manifesto

We will uncovering better ways of using the manifesto as an inspiration

Yves Hanoulle
& Nele Van Beveren

In this session we will create our own manifesto, not to replace the old (stil great one) yet to have one that defines the participants.

We will also explain at meta level why the workshop is created the way it was created.

Goal of the session: participants will learn how to unity a team around team values
Intended audience: all
Expected experience: no experience
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Agile got a big boost when the agile manifesto was created.

Many people coming to xpdays have read the first page, some even both pages. Other have helped translating it.

Yves is studying it at regular intervals to look for inspiration.

Yet it’s a historical document. Created in 2002 by 17 white males.

These days when Yves start with a new team, he like to give them 40 or more statements, (and a few empty cards) and let’s them create their own list of:

That is, while there is value in the items on

the right, we value the items on the left more.

In this workshop, we let multiple groups create their own team manifesto and explain it to each other.

Not as general one, yet one that they as a team think would help them.

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max
40

The ultimate collaboration mindset

Avoid the traps of the ‘I understand the situation best’ mindset

Siemen Bastiaens

Two mindsets:

One leads to great results & motivated people. The other one… not so much.

What’s yours?

Goal of the session: To have an opportunity to really evaluate their own values and assumptions concerning working together and how that drivers their, and their teams results.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke,Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: None, this is an introductionary course to the unilateral control & mutual learning mindset.
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Do you recognize those situations in which:

  • Discussions that go nowhere with all parties just stating their views and not really listening to others?
  • People who seem more concerned with getting ‘their’ solution to be implemented than arriving at the best outcome possible?
  • People only sharing information that helps prove their point and disregarding the rest?

These behaviours originate from a toxic mindset known as ‘unilateral control’, in this session we will dive into this mindset and examine what beliefs it is built upon.

Of course we will also look at a more healthy way of looking at interations, the mutual learning mindset.

Together we will look into the mirror and discover how much of a unilateral controller we are and explore some ways to become more ‘mutual learner’ as an individual, or as a team.

This session is based primarily on ‘The Skilled Facilitator’ & ‘Smart leaders, smarter teams’ by Roger Schwarz.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Dataviz for Agile practitioners

How would your approach and sensibility within an agile project change if you started by working with charcoal and paper instead of code and screens?

Koen De keersmaecker

Data is the raw material from which a range of outputs such as data visualisation and information graphics are created. However, this material is often dealt with digitally and rarely engaged with in a tangible, physical way. How would your approach and sensibility within an agile project change if you started by working with charcoal and paper instead of code and screens?

In this short intro-workshop, we’ll explore ways of creating data-driven visual systems by taking techniques from the world of bikablo and design and applying them to data.

We’ll think about the creation of a visualisation system through using a handmade design process as a way to communicate information.

By the end of this workshop, you’ll have a first flavor of understanding the data visualisation design process.

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DDD from a trench

How Domain Driven Design allowed a mere PO to fully grasp and optimise value creation

Jeroen Tiebout

A true story with practical examples of how DDD, ubiquitous language, event storming, a lot of drawing and talking allowed a team to reach high performance and <spoiler alert> ultimately fail.

A humorous -I hope- intro to Domain Driven Design which we’ll close off with an introductory workshop on Big Picture Event Storming of a team’s development value stream.

Goal of the session: A basic understanding of what DDD and event storming is, why we loved it and why you should too.
Intended audience: Everyone!
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Being given the mission to roll out a new version of a Print editing suite, one team (supported by many) rose to the challenge and succeeded. The team protested when tasked to roll out this new version to some other editorial services, but had to cave.

The resistance was born and our users agreed; why upgrade if we gain so little?

We managed to convince the right people to let us give it a go and we started untangling a mess of tightly coupled apps and services. Through concepts and techniques like “Event Storming”, “Ubiquitous Language” and “Bounded contexts”, I, a mere PO, was introduced to DDD.

Our team got shut down, our code no longer runs, but our domain events live on.

I’d love to tell you this story and introduce you to Event Storming. You’ll be able to put this to practice within your teams the next day. Fun!

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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The value of budget in a multi project context

experience the madness of multi-project budgets and see real cases of doing it differently.

Jan De Baere

You have a year budget of 10 million euro to spend on people for projects. What is the total amount of euros you could promise projects for?

– experience the issue.

– learn an alternative to know how much you can create/promise

– “Before and after” cases from the trenches

Team members learn why planning is going wrong so often.

Managers learn a proper way to deal with multi project planning.

Goal of the session: How to deal with multi project planning in an agile way.
Intended audience: Vincent; George; Bram; Leo; Joke;
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
A spoon and a fork are both great tools. When used for the wrong food they become useless and frustrating. This is true for tools in general. Budgeting is a good tool when used for the proper thing.

Over the years of working with different clients I remarked that budget is still being used as a planning tool. Style, I have a budget of x euro for next year so I can promise for x euro of projects. Intuitively this makes sense, in reality the total is nowhere near a simplistic addition of time or budget.

The result is frustration from client side for not delivering what was promised. Frustration from delivery teams for being put under constant pressure and possible (probable) low quality. Frustration from management side as things are not going as foreseen. As in a lot of cases we are collectively delivering results nobody wants and everybody has the perfect excuse.

For sure we can drop projects and budgets all together and go for the revolution. Question we answer in this session is what if you want to go for an evolutionary approach. When are budgets appropriate and how to estimate what you can deliver in some future? How can we have more business agility.

session setup:

– First we are going to experience the issue we are dealing with through simulation.

– Then we will learn an alternative to know how much you can create/promise

– I’ll share some cases “Before and after” from the trenches

– Q&A & experience sharing

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

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Presenters

Ron Eringa

Ron Eringa

Website: http://roneringa.com

Twitter: @roneringa

Ron is a consultant\trainer with a focus on Leadership Development.

He strongly believes that leadership is not only for managers but it should be present in all levels of an organization:

– He helps managers become true Servant Leaders that inspire and help Agile teams grow to their full potential.

– He helps Scrum Masters develop self-organized, high performing teams

– He helps Product Owners to create an environment where teams develop brilliant ideas and valuable products

In his private life, Ron is a husband and father of 2 daughters. His hobbies are running, skiing, photography and reading.

As a Professional Scrum Trainer and Steward for the Leadership trainings he works with Scrum.org.

Clients Ron worked with:

ASML, Philips, NXP Semiconductors, TomTom, Achmea, PinkRoccade, CCV, Beslist.nl, ANWB, Driessen HRM & Fokker.


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Stijn Decneut

Stijn Decneut

Website: https://agile-beyond.com/

Building on the biological bases of human behaviour, I provide training, mentoring & coaching in organisations facing volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous challenges.


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Geert De Cang

Geert De Cang

Website: https://agile-beyond.com/

Twitter: @geertdecang

Passionate Agile trainer who builds on awesome insights from neurobiology. Helping our customers adopt Agile in a way that actually makes sense.


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Marjoke Franken

Marjoke Franken

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marjokefranken/

Twitter: @majokef

I named my company Beyond Work, because to me and I believe to most people, work is never just work. I show up at work and everywhere as a whole human being, with all I have to give.

As (agile) coach I invite those I work with to be more aware of how they show up at work, believing the awareness affects them as a whole.

I help people, teams and organisations be more aware of reality, of options and intentions, enabling them to regain ownership and authorship of their own story and help them see what is really going on.

I help them with their puzzles and coach them towards answers and solutions.

I’m at my best when I engage a team full of resistance. With change comes resistance. Understanding what the purpose of the resistance is, makes change less scary. An invitation to try something new and see if it´s worth adopting creates space.


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Michel Grootjans

Michel Grootjans has been programming since the age of 12. He has programmed strange machines like the TI 99-4A, the Atari 2600, Mac128, HP28, Apple II, Siemens PLC’s using languages like Basic, Pascal, C, HyperTalk, Assembler, … along the way.

His professional experiences includes building enterprise applications for government, chemical plants, telecom, HR, insurance companies, … in java, C# and ruby.

He’s an independent technical agile coach. He coaches agile teams on continuous improvement, trying to find the most productive principles and practices to deliver value for the customer as fast as possible, while aiming for a product that is both flexible and maintainable.

Presentation Bio:

He’s been giving regular talks at conferences like XpDays BeNeLux, ACCU, Agile .net Europe, Arrrrcamp. Topics have included:

– visual notetaking

– Rails for n00bs

– the importance of readability in code

– a lot coding katas in java, C#, Ruby and javascript

– pragmatic project setup ⇒ how to privately setup source control and CI in 15 minutes


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Kenny Baas-Schwegler

Kenny Baas-Schwegler

Website: http://baasie.com

Twitter: @kenny_baas

Kenny Baas-Schwegler is a software engineer and strategic technology consultant focusing on building quality into software delivery at Xebia. He mentors, coaches and consults teams by using practices techniques and tools from Domain-Driven Design, Behaviour-Driven Development, Test-Driven Development, and Continuous Delivery.

Through Aikido training he learned the most efficient way to work together. To get the outcome that all parties want, energy should not be blocked but should be bent and influenced. The philosophy behind this line of reasoning is not only embedded in his personal life, but also in his work life. He is an advocate for multidisciplinary collaboration in open spaces. By using and combining tools such as EventStorming, and Example Mapping, he helps engineer requirements to design and model software. With these approaches, he aims to create a transparent, collaborative space with constant and instant feedback when delivering software.

Besides his daily work, he also helps organise several meetups for Behaviour Driven Development NL, Domain Driven Design Nederland and EventStorming Netherlands and also often speaks and gives hands-on workshops at conferences and meetups.


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João Rosa

Website: https://joaorosa.io

Twitter: @joaoasrosa

João is a Strategic Software Delivery Consultant at Xebia. He focuses on helping teams and organizations to make strategic decisions regarding the software; aligning teams and software to optimize the stream-based value. He believes in the power of collaboration and is a fan of visual collaboration tools. On his free time, you can find him relaxing reading a book or trying some culinary experiences.


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Jord Rengerve

Jord Rengerve

Website: http://peopleblendit.com

Twitter: @JorddeRengerve

Jord Rengerve is a freelancer Agile Coach. He worked as IT developer for 10 years and as Program manager for another 10 years. He worked in large international companies (Syntegra, Amadeus) and in public administration (currently as a consultant in European commission). As a coach, he promotes a best of breed approach of traditional project management and Agile. He trusts that no organisation can exist without both. He is a big fan of board games and values the benefits of serious games to deliver knowledge in a fun way during workshops he organises on Meetup and for his customers.


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Mykola Gurov

Twitter: @Ngurov

Mykola is a java backend developer (calls himself full-stack). He has a keen interest in CI/CD, testing, and everything that helps to move faster without breaking too many things. Since 2015 he works at bol.com, one of the biggest online retailers of the Netherlands.


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Ruud Rietveld

Ruud Rietveld

Website: http://trailblazers.nl

Twitter: @ruudriet

I am an Agnostic Agile Coach (and have some PSM-certifications), focussing on getting a team to self-organising. Working at Trailblazers, a young Dutch purpose-driven organization set up using Sociocracy 3.0.

50 years old, have a great wife, am father of a 17-year-old son. Playing (beach)volleyball, Dungeons & Dragons, reading fantasy and professional books, playing games.


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Joanne Boerstoel

Although educated as a geologist I am happily working in IT since 1996 and for the past 12 years I am passionate about Scrum and Agile. As a Scrum Master and Agnostic Agile coach I have helped many teams in different settings to become self-organizing and organizations to have an Agile mindset. Being ‘born agile’ for me this is the natural way to do things. However, I learned that this is not the case everywhere and for everybody so along the way I picked up a toolbox with different methods, team coaching skills and agile games to help people along. I love brainstorming with other people and experimenting to keep on trying to find different, better ways to reach our goals. I like bridging gaps wherever they are, between Business and IT, IT and customer, management and team. I am now a senior Scrum Master / Agile Coach at Trailblazers.


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Karen De Boeck

Karen De Boeck

Website: https://www.adjugo.com/

When discovering Lean and (Scaled) Agile, I was instantly enthousiast. They brought me an answer to the obstacles and frustrations I had encountered for years as analyst, project manager, change manager in business and IT.

I dived into the concept and practices, and got energized by the experience and even more by the new mindset.

I soon discovered new challenges. In most of the teams the question was not how to ‘be agile’, but how to ‘become’ agile. The journey from A to B.

Creation of value and customer focus, open feedback, incremental delivery and self-governing teams are not the automatic consequence of introducing scrum or limiting work in progress.

Team growing, or helping the team to become self-organized and to grow gradually and incrementally, towards the goal they set for themselves. Call it change management, coaching the transition, or supporting team growing.

Eager to share my experiences in making the journey from A to B, following the principles of B.


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[email protected]


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Jan Sem

Jan Sem

Website: https://www.sweetmustard.be

Twitter: @jansembe

Building the right thing, the right way by helping people, teams and organisations grow and reinvent themselves. Lately shifting from team coach to organisational coach, inspired by teal and spiral dynamics.


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[email protected]


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Marcel Blok

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcel-blok/

During the last 20 years Marcel has worked at a lot of different positions: developer, scrum master/coach, business analyst, product owner, architect, manager. In all jobs he always asks why are we doing this? Can’t we do better? And what he always discovers is that we can do better. At small scale or at large scale.


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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Website: http://www.warmolts-ict.nl

Twitter: @sannygr

Sandra Warmolts is an Agile coach, Continuous Deliver coach, scrum master, product owner and trainer in Agile, Scrum, Kanban, DevOps, Less and Lean product development, with 16 years of experience. The combination of software development and teamwork make her job the best in the world. She helps organizations transform to better ways of working together on the product with customers.

She’s mother of a 16 year old girl and 15 year old boy, lives with her husband and kids in Kropswolde (Groningen), loves to play tennis and go to conferences.


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Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Website: http://value-first.be

Twitter: vfrederik

I’m on a personal mission to transform organisations and the workplace and bring them into the 21th century, using modern-day (new) ways of working and leadership. Honestly, I am on a continuous discovery & exploration how to create a happy, productive, creative workplace where everybody feels good!

If you want to know more about my background, studies, certifications, experiences, interests … connect with me on http://linkedin.com/in/frederikvannieuwenhuyse/ and my professional activities, check https://value-first.be/

Happy to listen to you and reflect! How can I help you, today?

Frederik is also XP Days Benelux co-organizer and event organizer at the Agile Belgium meetup. My interests go very wide… agile/lean/lean-startup/leadership/sociocracy/coaching/facilitation/…


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Dette van Zeeland

Dette van Zeeland

Website: https://www.golvenmaken.be

Twitter: @DettevanZeeland

As Sociocracy 3.0 coach I love to inspire and facilitate organisations and teams to collaborate in more conscious and effective ways, based on equivalence and ownership. I support organisations to become a smart, living system that taps into the collective wisdom, that embrace a culture of trust, respect and radical openness and that designs a structure that can handle complexity and continuous change in our vuca world. My passion also lies in facilitating social innovation, commons and bottomarchy, for which I use the monicker Golven Maken (Making Waves).

On a personal level I found Voice Dialogue to be a very effective and healthy way to become a wholer, and more balanced person. My journey here is my own development and to help others as Voice Dialogue Facilitator. Today I coach others in finding purpose in their life path, their undertakings and in developing an entrepreneurial mind set.

Sociocratie 3.0 (S3) is my first love to facilitate the above, but I incorporate my expertise in change management, agile and scrum, community management, Teal, NWOW, system dynamics, non violent communication and much more. Please continu reading on www.golvenmaken.be.


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Christiaan Verwijs

Website: https://theliberators.com

Twitter: @chrisverwijs

I enjoy igniting positive change in teams and organisations. It is my strong belief that people should be empowered to drive change themselves, rather than being told by management or consultants how to change.

My personal mission is to liberate the world from dehumanizing and demotivating workplaces by helping organizations find better ways to tap into the creativity, the intelligence and the wisdom of people. I feel that this is the best way forward in this world of complex work.

Based on my personal experience and my background in software engineering and organisational psychology, I have found both the Scrum Framework and Liberating Structures to be powerful ingredients here.


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William Water

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/wjwater/

Enthusiast who likes to develop great products, build better teams and improve the way we work. Lead developer at HROffice.


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Dajo Breddels

Website: http://www.dajobreddels.com

Twitter: @dajobreddels

Organizational Change Coach

Presented at different Agile Conferences.


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Jan de Vries

Website: http://linkedin.com/in/jandevries

Jan de Vries is a senior trainer, business IT consultant and public speaker in the fields of Business Information Management, DevOps, Scaled Agile and Antifragility.

He is convenor of the Enterprise DevOps group that conducts research on large scale deployment of DevOps in organisations.

He founded Blue Ocean Recon to facilitate the development of Blue Oceans and Lean Startups.


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Nelis Boucké

Nelis Boucké

Twitter: @nelisboucke

Software crafter with a profound interest in defining environments where teams can thrive to build great product.

  • Experience with agile transformations, software architecture and technical excellence in both SME and corporate settings.
  • Focus on delivering results. Agile in itself is not a goal, but Agile principles help to deliver value in rapidly changing environments.
  • Experiences in assessing and setting up technical excellence to deliver quality products.
  • Worked with companies in the following domains: energy, logistics and automation, automated warehouse systems, tank terminals, public transport, municipalities and government administration, security, banking.


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Matteo Pierro

Matteo Pierro

Twitter: @matteo_pierro

Hi, my name is Matteo and I’m a Software Craftsman and a Technical Coach. eXtreme Programming practitioner and TDD lover, I’m very passionate about creating well crafted software that delivers high value to the customer.

I’m addicted to conferences and meetups. I love to share knowledge with people in order to improve myself and hopefully inspire other people.


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Stefan Vanlokeren

Started as a functional analyst, quickly involved in Project Management.

Got infected by Scrum in 2012.

I’m passionate about exploring and exploiting the full potential of teams working together, creating an environment of learning, trust & happiness, so that the team members, customers and shareholders will be blown away by unexpected high service & results.


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Jurgen Maus

Three years ago we started our transistion at Barco to be more Agile. I have been asked to work as a scrum master. I was lucky to be guided by two fantastic coaches that inspired me in many different ways. They really introduced me in the world of Lean, Agile, coaching, experiments, facilitations…

Today I’m a big believer in persons & teams that take ownership of their own goals, improvements and changes. Coaching and guiding them towards that ownership is a big challenge, but makes it worthwhile by every step they take.


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Evelien Acun-Roos

Website: http://www.evelienroos.nl

Twitter: @evelienroos2

Evelien Acun-Roos is an experienced Agile Coach at Xebia and a Professional Scrum Trainer at Scrum.org. She has helped many teams at different organizations to become more Agile (ING, Rabobank, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, APG, Philips, Vodafone/Ziggo). She likes to focus on the Scrum Teams and the people the team consists of. Evelien loves starting up new teams and to support teams to become high performing.

Evelien loves to give training for beginning as well as experienced Scrummers. Her training courses are filled with brain based learning activities. In her classes she lets the learner learn instead of the teacher teach.

She is also the Scrum Master of the Scrum Master Cluster within Xebia, helping other Scrum Masters to become better Scrum Masters.


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Laurens Bonnema

Laurens Bonnema

Website: https://xebia.com/agile-transformations

Twitter: @laurensbonnema

Agile Management Consultant and Graphic Facilitator. Mentor to managers creating Agile organizations. I make boring business notes fun!


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Yves Hanoulle

Yves Hanoulle

Website: http://www.hanoulle.be

Twitter: @YvesHanoulle

Too many pages to keep my bioo up to date: the only up to date bio is www.hanoulle.be/yves

I worked as software support, developer, team lead, trainer, agile coach, change artist, first follower, thought jockey. These days I call myself Creative Collaboration Agent.

I believe that IT is mainly about working with people.

A skill that can never be learned enough.

Team startups & retrospectives are my favorite ways to help your team(s).

y


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Nele Van Beveren

Nele Van Beveren

Twitter: @nelevanbeveren

I’m an Agile enthusiast with experience in Business and ICT. First Agile experience in 2010 (scrum team member, product owner), and in love ever since. I formally 😉 worked as an Agile coach from 2013-2017. Since 2017, I have a management role, and keep on inspiring and coaching own team(s), other teams and peers.

I like to challenge people, to improve their way of working. Love to inspire people on the things I am passionate about (ICT, change, Agile,…). I also like to learn people new things, and let them experiment as much as possible.

I like to combine work and fun!


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Siemen Bastiaens

Siemen Bastiaens

I’m a Freelance Agile Professional currently working as a ScrumMaster & Agile Coach @ VRT.

I describe myself as a coach with a heart for Agile/Lean. Passionate about enriching peoples lives, always looking for; and trying out new ideas that have that potential!


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Koen De keersmaecker

Koen De keersmaecker

Website: http://www.bizzuals.com

Twitter: @KDekeersmaecker

Koen De keersmaecker is a visual facilitator, visual trainer and visual coach. He is founder of Bizzuals, a visual incubator that empowers people and organisations to think with the pen. His main observation is “People think they understand each other, but in reality they don’t.”

As bikablo® certified global trainer, he trains and coaches people and teams in the bikablo® visualization technique — a technique which improves learning, knowledge transfer, dialogue and collaboration.

Over the last 10 years , he has been working as a pragmatic “Enterprise Lean-Agile Coach”, supporting companies big and small in their improvement journeys in immer changing markets, be it adoption Agile mindset or thriving as a start -up.

Today his passion is exploring new techniques and methods for inspiring people and how to make their messages stick.

He lives with his wife and 2 sons in Antwerp.


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Jeroen Tiebout

Jeroen Tiebout

Twitter: @jeroentbt

With an eclectic skill set, a broad technical background and an urge to dig in to products, domains and processes I facilitate customers, stakeholders and delivery teams in the creation of working solutions that solve real use cases.

I am a strong believer in servant leadership, kaizen, radical candor, extreme ownership, liberating structures, DevOps as a mindset, domain driven design and strong convictions that are weakly held.

Currently trying my hand in an Agile transformation of a major financial institution as an Agile/DevOps coach.


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Jan De Baere

In order to deal with and even thrive on the ever increasing speed and complexity we need to collaborate and organize in another way. Thanks to the explosion of social technology, today we have other possibilities of dealing with these challenges/opportunities.

The bottom-up approach usualy used in agile transformations is morphing into cultural transformations where the whole company and all the aspects are changing. Moving from static to dynamic organizations. Coaching organizations on this journey is what Jan does.

His specialization is on enterprise/business agility and organizational structures.


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Participants

Jan
Jan
Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That’s where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought “well, let’s give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it”. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it’s an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram
Bram has never missed an XP Days. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn’t know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn’t really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he’s relaxed, who knows what could happen? –Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges
Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he’s chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can’t be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they….?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don’t do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don’t fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants… He’s heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with “agile” methods, so he comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what “agile” can offer him. He doesn’t know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well… What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user’s lives. That’s one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this “agile” stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen
Ellen is an agile coach. She’s been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean… it doesn’t matter much to her. She’s more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions