Thursday 2019

Thursday 28th of November
De Samenwerking De Visie De Uitdaging Het Inzicht De Interactie De Vernieuwing
08:00 Registration & Coffee
09:00 Welcome
09:30  50 tips and tricks for Facilitation

Per Beining
&
Rikke Thomsen Kornby

Max: 30 
 Heuristics in decision making

Stanislava Potupchik

Max: 30 
 Creating a safe-to-fail environment

Robert van Lieshout
&
Linda van Sinten

Max: 80 
 Scrumban NOT explained – experienced instead

Koen Vastmans
&
Sangeetha Sridhar

Max: 28 
 Hexagonal Architecture hands-on

Marc Evers
&
[email protected]

Max: 25 
SPECIALS
11:00 Coffee Break
11:30  15 teams, 1 monolith and 4 months to achieve Continuous Delivery

Thierry de Pauw

 HR Goes Agile

Zuzi Sochova

 Help, no managers…

Ralph van Roosmalen

 Ten hundred words

Marcel Blok

Hexagonal Architecture hands-onCONTINUED
12:00 15 teams, 1 monolith and 4 months to achieve Continuous DeliveryCONTINUED HR Goes AgileCONTINUED  Accelerated Learning: How Can Agile Help You?

Artur Margonari

Max: 500 
 The art of polarisation

Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 25 
Hexagonal Architecture hands-onCONTINUED
12:30 Lunch
13:30 Plenary session
14:00  Zombie Scrum Guerrilla Strategies

Christiaan Verwijs
&
Barry Overeem

Max: 50 
 Self-selection for teams

Sandra Warmolts
&
Lilian Nijboer

 Tension at the Kitchen Wench (Sociocratic Decision Making in practice)

Martin van Dijken
&
Ruud Rietveld

Max: 30 

Expect spoilers and at this point only a Dutch version which we will translate before the session.

 Coaching stance to coaching dance

Barry Heins
&
Ori Drory

Max: 12 
 Where to start with a Legacy Codebase

Matteo Pierro
&
Nelis Boucké

Computer
Max: 20 

https://github.com/supernelis/workshop-renovating-legacy-codebase

15:30 Coffee Break
16:00  The Product Owner, the great facilitator

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

 Go Fish!

Steven Deneir
&
Jeremy Naus

Max: 20 
  Focus, focus and more focus to deliver value

Ziryan Salayi

 Avengers : a devops sysops team from autonomy to self-direction at oui.sncf

Luc Taesch
&
[email protected]


tbd after acceptance (an article summarizing the experience, models descriptions, including maturity model, and resilience model

 Legacy Code Refactoring with the Golden Master and the Mikado Method

Philippe Bourgau

Max: 40 

The few slides to the talk (most of it is live coding)

 Three little pigs. Blending Design Thinking with Agile for human-centred change at VRT.

Bart Vermijlen
&
Sven Lardon

Max: 50 
16:30 The Product Owner, the great facilitatorCONTINUED Go Fish!CONTINUED Focus, focus and more focus to deliver value CONTINUED Avengers : a devops sysops team from autonomy to self-direction at oui.sncfCONTINUED Legacy Code Refactoring with the Golden Master and the Mikado MethodCONTINUED Three little pigs. Blending Design Thinking with Agile for human-centred change at VRT.CONTINUED
17:00 Closing
17:30 Drinks at the bar (sponsored by Co-Learning)
18:00 Conference dinner (included in ticketprice)
20:00 Evening programme (see open space board at the venue)
Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro’s and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

max
30

50 tips and tricks for Facilitation

Strengthen your facilitation muscles

Per Beining
& Rikke Thomsen Kornby

We invite you to an extreme participatory session, where the focus is not only on learning the tips and tricks have gathered over the past 40 years of experience, but also try them out in a safe? and engaging environment.

If you are more into a passive sitdown and listen type of session – this is is not for you!

Goal of the session: Participants are expected to come out of the session energized and with a renewed believe in their abilities to facilitate any type of session, workshop, training or … [again fill in more words]
Intended audience: Primarily Ellen. Also Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent and Joke.
Expected experience: No facilitation experience needed as long as you want to be actively engaged in working on your facilitation skills.
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
We will share our best tips and tricks – in the form of a deck of cards – that helps you remember – what to do and not to do – when preparing, executing and exploring your facilitation.

We invite you to an extreme participatory session, where the focus is not only on learning the tips and tricks have gathered over the past 40 years of experience, but also try them out in a safe? and engaging environment.

If you are more into a passive sitdown and listen type of session – this is is not for you!

Expect it to be loud, jazzy, funny, upbeat, tempofilled and … [fill in more words]

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Heuristics in decision making

How to take decisions in the environment of uncertainty

Stanislava Potupchik

I might assume that many of us operate in complex or even chaotic domain of Cynefin framework. In that unpredictable world, how difficult it is for us to take decisions? Are there any specific ways to learn how to approach it when you can’t analyze all the risks, gather enough information, or be a detective to fine proven clues. How do we act then?

I invite you to experience that in practice in the safe environment of a serious game. During this session we will create an artificial domain of uncertainty where we can try out some risky ways of taking decisions and learn from it

Goal of the session: learn patterns of how to take decisions in the situation of uncertainty
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: intermediate level of making decisions, can be a beginner in agile
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
Gerd Gigerenzer is a German scientist studying the art of taking decisions in the environment of uncertainty (what we call complexity and chaos in Cynefin model). During this session we are going to play serious games to live through practical experience of using heuristics to take decisions. After each game we will reflect on what we felt, what we learned and how we can use it in our every day life.

During this workshop you will be able to work in small groups of 4-6 people, practicing and debriefing together guided by exercises and questions that I prepared for you. Don’t expect to be bored for even a minute there

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
80

Creating a safe-to-fail environment

How to create an environment where your teams feel safe to speak up, to experiment, and to fail?

Robert van Lieshout
& Linda van Sinten

You’ve heard it before: psychological safety is crucial in your team / organization if you want it to become high performing.

In this session you will get to practice techniques to help create an environment where people feel safe to speak up, to experiment, and to fail.

Our exercises are based on Amy Edmondson’s book “The Fearless Organization”, and we’ve been lucky enough to be able to discuss and get feedback on our approach with Amy herself.

Goal of the session: Show you what you can do to start building a safe-to-fail environment
Intended audience: Ellen, Georges, Vincent, Joke
Expected experience: No specific experience required
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
You’ve heard it before: Google says it, Harvard’s Professor of Leadership and Management, Amy C. Edmondson says it: psychological safety in your teams is crucial.

Great, but what does that mean exactly? And how do you create an environment where your teams feel safe to speak up, to experiment, and to fail?

In this workshop we’ll give you a taste of psychological safety and show you what you can do to start building a safe-to-fail environment. We will guide you through exercises that correspond to each of the three categories defined in Amy Edmondson’s book “The Fearless Organization”:

  • Setting the Stage
  • Inviting Participation
  • Responding Productively

And we’ll show you that it works too! You’ll end the workshop feeling more psychologically safe than you felt at the start.

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
28

Scrumban NOT explained – experienced instead

Scrumban simulation: A fun way to learn how to deal with planned and unplanned work in an iterative context

Koen Vastmans
& Sangeetha Sridhar

Are you struggling to get both your planned and unplanned work done? Have you considered trying scrumban? No? This is the opportunity to experience in a fun and safe environment what scrumban can mean for you.
Goal of the session: Experience what scrumban can mean to deal with both planned and unplanned work
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: knowing the basics of scrum and kanban
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
In the past we experienced the need to provide guidance on how to combine both planned and unplanned work. Typically operational teams have a tendency to jump on every incident that occurs, whether it is important or not, neglecting their planned work.

Similarly, development teams tend focus more on creating new features than dealing with unplanned work like incidents. Working in iterations can give them focus but the nature of their work makes that plain scrum or kanban is not really fit for them.

Therefore we created the scrumban simulation to teach teams how to find the balance between planned and unplanned work.

If you want to experience the benefts of scrumban via a simulation, then join this session to explore.

Not convinced yet? Then check out this web site: https://scrumbansim.wixsite.com/simulation

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
25

Hexagonal Architecture hands-on

Marc Evers
& [email protected]

Hexagonal Architecture (also known as Ports & Adapters or Clean Architecture) is a way of structuring your software components and to manage dependencies so that you can focus on domain concepts and business logic. Hexagonal architecture helps to decouple from implementation details and frameworks, and it helps to decide on a good test approach.

In this workshop, we will introduce the principles and trade-offs with a concrete example. Participants will apply the concepts in a hands-on design exercise.

Goal of the session: Learn how to achieve a better separation of concerns in software components; learn a technique to make better decisions about dependencies in and between software components
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Bram, Hank, Ellen
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Hexagonal Architecture (also known as Ports & Adapters or Clean Architecture) is a way of structuring your software components and to manage dependencies so that you can focus on domain concepts and business logic. Hexagonal architecture helps to decouple from implementation details and frameworks, and it helps to decide on a good test approach.

The term ‘hexagonal architecture’ was coined by Alistair Cockburn in the early 2000s, describing a way of developing and testing domain logic separately from database logic and other dependencies. Other people have found similar approaches, like Clean Architecture and Onion Architecture.

The premise of Hexagonal Architecture is that you want your software to be about the domain concepts (business logic), not about implementation details like databases, UIs, REST calls, etc. – we want to separate domain concepts from mechanics. Still, we need things likes databases, APIs, UIs for our software to be useful.

Hexagonal architecture gives us concepts to structure dependencies between our domain concepts and mechanics. We have applied it in multiple projects and found it facilitates incremental design and continued refactoring. Its benefits greatly outweigh its costs.

We will introduce the principles and trade-offs with a concrete example and some code. Then you will get to apply the concepts to a case we introduce: you will sketch a design – concepts, objects, and their dependencies – using pen/paper/post-its.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


15 teams, 1 monolith and 4 months to achieve Continuous Delivery

From twice a year to twice a month

Thierry de Pauw

This is the story of 15 teams and one monolithic application going from bi-annual releases to fortnightly releases in 4 months time achieving a state of Continuous Delivery.
Goal of the session: Be able to kick-start a Continuous Delivery program. Be able to use the Improvement Kata to introduce change at scale. Be able to run a Value Stream Mapping workshop to understand the current situation. Be able to use the Theory of Constraints to identify which activity should be improved first. Be able to mitigate fear.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen, Hank
Expected experience: Have a basic understanding of what continuous delivery actually is.
Session Type: 60 min short experience report (30 min)
This is the story of 15 teams and one monolithic application going from bi-annual releases to fortnightly releases in 4 months time achieving a state of Continuous Delivery.

The reason for that move: the cost and time for testing quality into the software product, stabilising and releasing the product during each bi-annual release were skyrocketing.

Continuous Delivery involves a long list of technology and organisational changes that you have to apply to the unique circumstances of your organisation. Where do you start?

This is where The Improvement Kata, Value Stream Mapping and Theory of Constraints will help in identifying which change to apply first. However, because of the short time frame, it soon became an example of fear conversations.

After this session, you’ll understand how The Improvement Kata, Value Stream Mapping and Theory of Constraints can kick-start a Continuous Delivery program and mitigate fear.

Folks who should attend are anyone involved near and far in designing, creating, testing, deploying and releasing a software product.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


HR Goes Agile

Agile HR is an enabler of an Agile organization. “Don’t just do Agile, grow Agile in your organization.”

Zuzi Sochova

Session Type: experiential learning session
Agile HR is an enabler of an Agile organization. “Don’t just do Agile, grow Agile in your organization.”

As Agile application extends out of IT and is more and more common at the organizational level, the need for change in the HR is inevitable. Agile changes entire organizational culture, which is built on collaboration, servant leadership, and empowerment, that brings into the picture variety of different tools, practices, and last but not least new focus to employee experience.

Learning Outcomes:

Understand the fundamental need behind the Agile HR shift

Be aware of how HR can help the organization to change the mindset

Know what practices to avoid

Get a number of useful practices to become your Agile HR journey

Back to program


Help, no managers…

A real story about a organization without managers.

Ralph van Roosmalen

Do we need managers? Do we need management? Are organizations without managers not just a fairy tale? Attend my session to hear a real story, no fairy tale, about a real company without managers. How do we hire people, decide on salaries, bonuses, goal setting, and fire people?
Intended audience: Ellen, Joke, Vincent,Georges
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
Many people talk about Agile management, self-organizing teams, organizations without managers, but do they really exist?

Yes, they do! I am the CEO of Management 3.0, and I have no say as a manager about how we manage the company. I am just one of the team members, the company (including me) won’t accept managers. To make things more complicated, we are also fully distributed.

How do we do things?

In this talk, I will share how we decide on salaries, how we decide on who is going to do what, how we define our bonuses, how do we hire and fire people. All the things that are taken care of by managers in many organizations.

The take away will be to realize it is possible to have an organization without managers!

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Ten hundred words

Marcel Blok

Can you explain stuff using only the most simple words? In this meeting we will try to explain what we do using the ten hundred most used words. By doing this we may learn what we actually do, learn to explain things better and learn a fun form of imagining new stuff by not allowing our selves to use some things.
Goal of the session: Fun, new ideas for a look-back-and-learn meeting, understanding to talk in simple words
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 30 min discovery session
We all talk to each other. But sometimes we do not understand each other very well. Some people use words that are hard to understand. We all do. Sometimes we use these words while we do not understand them our selves.

After reading “Thing Explainer” by Randall Munroe where he explains hard to understand stuff in simple words, the idea for this meeting appeared. Can you explain what you do or how you work to a five year old? If you can you can probably also explain to important working people or people that do other work than yourself.

This game will not only help you explain stuff better, but will also show us that by not allowing our selves to do some things we can more easily find new ideas or imagine new things. It is something that you can use with your team, maybe in a look-back-and-learn meeting.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
500

Accelerated Learning: How Can Agile Help You?

Have you ever thought about applying your Agile knowledge to learn something new?Want to learn how to play an instrument? Want to learn a new language? Want to know how to juggle balls? Archery? Dance?Whatever is the new skill you are willing to learn, believe me: agile can help you.

Artur Margonari

Have you ever thought about applying your Agile knowledge to learn something you want? Want to learn how to play an instrument? Want to learn a new language? Or how to juggle balls? Whatever is the new skill, believe me: Agile can help you with it.

In our life, we often face the need of learning something new. It can be to use in our jobs, to impress the person we love, to simply for fun or as a new hobby. Whatever is the reason, we know it can be challenging to acquire this skill and it cannot be (yet) downloaded straight into our brain like in some nice movies. We still need to read books, follow classes, research, practice and be patient. Because the learning curve might be very slow… or not!

I’ll share with the audience a technique to learn anything new very fast! It’s basically 5 simple steps. The reason why this method caught my attention: it’s incredibly similar to Agile values, principles and practices! Thus, if you know what Agile is about, you are halfway to use it in your favour to learn anything you want, fast.

Goal of the session: 1) Learn and be ready to apply a technique of accelerated learning which can be applied to pretty much anything 2) Understand what is the relation between this accelerated learning technique with Agile values and principles (Waterfall-style learning, move aside!) 3) Compare it to real examples of skills which I acquired and I’m acquiring in this way (failures and successes) 4) Be empowered and inspired to learn what you are eager to!
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen.
Expected experience: No. Everyone is more than welcome.
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
Have you ever thought about applying your Agile knowledge to learn something you want? Want to learn how to play an instrument? Want to learn a new language? Or how to juggle balls? Whatever is the new skill, believe me: Agile can help you with it.

In our life, we often face the need of learning something new. It can be to use in our jobs, to impress the person we love, to simply for fun or as a new hobby. Whatever is the reason, we know it can be challenging to acquire this skill and it cannot be (yet) downloaded straight into our brain like in some nice movies. We still need to read books, follow classes, research, practice and be patient. Because the learning curve might be very slow.

I’ll share with the audience a technique to learn anything new very fast! It’s basically 5 simple steps. The reason why this method caught my attention: it’s incredibly similar to Agile values, principles and practices! Thus, if you know what Agile is about, you are half way to use it in your favour to learn anything you want, fast.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
25

The art of polarisation

How to bring peace through conflicts and make better group decisions

Thien Que Nguyen

Can you be in conflict comfortably AND maintain the relationship?

In this session we are going to experience a method to help you resolve tension, disagreements and conflict by agreeing to go into an argument with the whole group; ‘ Let’s Talk’*. We will deep dive into the wonderful world of inclusion, culture and group dynamics.

After this session:

  • You have more awareness of polarity
  • You have become more aware of your own bias
  • You have walked in the other person’s shoes
Goal of the session: You have experienced a way to get into, and get out of an argument.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank
Expected experience: no experience
Session Type: 30 min experiential learning session
Most of us dislike conflicts. Most of us don’t really know how to face the tension that comes with conflict let alone resolve it. We have never really been taught how to resolve conflicts and maintaining the relationship.

When we do try to resolve the conflict, we often end up in a compromise, where it feels there is a winner and a looser.

Whatever the feeling, at least one person is not really satisfied and the tension is often not truly resolved. We tend to ignore this and “hide it under the carpet” but it does not go away. In fact it tends to get bigger over time and may result in us moving away from the person and losing the relationship.

In this session we are going to experience a method* to help you resolve tension, disagreements and conflict by agreeing to go into an argument; ‘Let’s Talk’*. We will work with the whole group.

*Let’s Talk is based on the Lewis Method

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Back to program


max
50

Zombie Scrum Guerrilla Strategies

Changing the seemingly un-changeable

Christiaan Verwijs
& Barry Overeem

In this seriously fun workshop we will tap into our collective intelligence to uncover guerrilla strategies to start shifting systems that are seemingly un-shifteable. We will share and uncover practical, down-to-earth and simple strategies to successfully change the environment of Scrum / Agile teams. And have some laughs while doing so 🙂
Goal of the session: Each participant will leave with concrete, practical out-of-the-box guerrilla strategies for shifting organisations
Intended audience: Leo, Marieke, Ellen, Bram
Expected experience: Experience with trying to improve the environment of Scrum / Agile teams
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
_Oh, the horror. You’ve been working with team ‘Power Rangers’ for a year now as their Scrum Master. When you started with Scrum, all seemed good at the beginning. You liked the idea of building small, incremental versions of your product. It made sense. But somewhere along the road something happened. Daily Scrums always take too long, with people going on and on and on about that one thing they’ve been working on. And because everyone’s working on their own things anyways, nobody really cares about what the others share. The Sprint Retrospective that promised ‘continuous improvement’ always results in the same minor improvements (‘fix the router’, ‘better coffee’ and ‘I don’t like Timmy’) that never really get addressed. Initially, this surprised you – you expected people to get the hang of the format you always use. Now you’ve just accepted that nothing really comes out of this time spent in a boring, smelly meeting room. Except stickies with words on them that inevitably end up in your drawer.

And let’s not get started about the Sprint Review. That awkward moment at the end of a Sprint where the message basically is that ‘We’re almost done’. But with only the Development Team – and sometimes the Product Owner – attending, it doesn’t really matter. There’s always another Sprint to finish the work. Not even the Product Owner cares.

Over time, you’ve learned to accept that this is apparently what Scrum is for this organization. And if nobody cares about it, why should you? But still you have this nagging feeling that things can be better. Then you visited this workshop_

In this seriously fun workshop we will tap into our collective intelligence, and use Liberating Structures to uncover guerrilla strategies for Scrum Masters, Product Owners and Developers to start shifting systems that are seemingly un-shifteable. This workshop will not feature a boring presentation. It will also not feature another fancy model. We will share and uncover practical, down-to-earth and simple strategies to successfully change the environment of Scrum / Agile teams. And have some laughs while doing so 🙂

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Self-selection for teams

Why, when and how to use self-selection for team creation

Sandra Warmolts
& Lilian Nijboer

In agile whe feel that decisions should be made by the people who are affected by these choices. So why not let people select the teams they work in? During this session you will experience self-selection, and get tips on how to prepare and facilitate self-selection.
Goal of the session: Participants will have lived through the experience of self-selection, and be able to support teams and organisations creating teams through self-selection.
Intended audience: teammembers, managers, teamleads, coaches, everyone working with or in teams
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
In agile we feel that decisions should be made by the people who are affected by these choices. So why not let people select the teams they work in?

Managers might find the idea challenging; how do I know I get the right teams?

Team members might might be scared no one wants them in their team, like in gym class at school. Most will agree though, that the team knows best. How can we help organisations an people overcome these ‘fears’ and help them in this process?

In this session we will share some theory and our own experiences and go through the process of self-selection. We have also asked others how they did Self-selection and will involve their stories too, to get a broad view.

And of course we will do a couple of rounds of actually letting you experience Self-selection with different assumptions each round, it will be fun and informative to do.

We will discuss what a good moment is to use this tool and how the prepare and facilitate a self-selection session.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Tension at the Kitchen Wench (Sociocratic Decision Making in practice)

Working with Consent Decision-Making

Martin van Dijken
& Ruud Rietveld

Sociocracy 3.0 has quite a number of cool patterns for teams to help themselves improve. In this session we will be working with Consent Decisison-Making from this toolkit. We will take you along in a role-play in Pancake restaurant The Screaming Kitchen Wench, where they wil have to take a couple of tough decisions. We will guide the process and explain the method itself, so that together you can bring the organisation of The Screaming Kitchen Wench a step further.
Goal of the session: Theory and practice on Consent Decision Making
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen, Marieke
Expected experience: No prior experience with S3 needed
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
Materials: Expect spoilers and at this point only a Dutch version which we will translate before the session.
Sociocracy 3.0 has quite a number of cool patterns for teams to help themselves improve. In this session we will be working with Consent Decisison-Making from this toolkit. We will take you along in a role-play in Pancake restaurant The Screaming Kitchen Wench, where they wil have to take a couple of tough decisions. We will guide the process and explain the method itself, so that together you can bring the organisation of The Screaming Kitchen Wench a step further.

At the end of the workshop you can start using this same case for yourself, since we open sourced it through the CC-BY-SA license (just like Sociocracy 3.0 is). So please go ahead, take your colleagues along and practice this sharp and quick way of making decisions.

The case of The Screaming Kitchenmaid has been set up in Dutch, and we will create an English version for the XPDays and further use (same license) when this session will be selected.

NL:

Sociocracy 3.0 bevat een flink aantal gave hulpmiddelen voor teams om zichzelf vooruit te helpen. In deze sessie gaan we aan het werk met Consent besluitvorming uit deze gereedschapskist. We nemen je mee in een rollenspel in pannenkoekenrestaurant de Gillende Keukenmeid, waar een aantal pittige besluiten genomen dienen te worden. Wij begeleiden het proces en leggen de werkvorm zelf uit, zodat je gezamenlijk de Keukenmeid een stapje verder kunt helpen.

Aan het einde van de workshop kun je zelf ook met deze case verder aangezien we hem open source gemaakt hebben middels de CC-BY-SA licentie, net zoals Sociocracy 3.0 zelf. Ga hierna dus gerust zelf met je collega’s aan de slag en oefen met deze scherpe en snelle manier van besluiten nemen.

Deze workshop kan in het Nederlands worden gehouden aangezien de case van de Gillende Keukenmeid door ons speciaal in het Nederlands opgezet is. We werken aan een Engelse vertaling voor XPDays.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
12

Coaching stance to coaching dance

Experience the effect of different coaching stances stances

Barry Heins
& Ori Drory

Explore coaching stances and learn about your preferred style and what style best suits the situation.
Goal of the session: Learn what stance you favour, explore coaching stances and experiment with them
Intended audience: Bram, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Novice to Advanced
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
It is time to explore how agile you are as a coach.

As Scrum Masters/ Agile Coaches we encounter various situations that call for different approaches. When we coach individuals, or teams, there are different approaches we can take. Do we coach, facilitate, teach or mentor?

In this workshop we invite participants to take a (coaching) stance and start dancing to the tunes of the presented challenge. Which means, knowing which coaching stance is most suited to help in solving the challenge at hand. Sometimes an individual lacks knowledge, and so we teach. Other times a group is unstructured in their discussions, and so we facilitate.

Each participant will be asked to identify which of the four coaching stance(s) they are most in tune with and which are more challenging for you to take on. From here on out as a group we will explore what is needed for you to be come a more versatile (Agile) Coach.

The four stances are as mentioned before: Coach, Facilitator, Teacher & Mentor.

In addition participants can bring their own real challenges to the workshop for other coaches to pick a stance to and help create solutions to overcome those challenges.

It’s time to dance.

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
20

Laptop

Where to start with a Legacy Codebase

Let’s explore few techniques to manage monsters

Matteo Pierro
& Nelis Boucké

In this session you will see how to approach a legacy systems adding effective and valuable automated tests. The technique that we will explore has very ancient roots. In the Middle Age, the only way to have new copies of a book was to use scribes. They had to manually copy the book and then check it with the original version produced by the Master. Amazingly we will see how we can use the same approach, called Golden Master, to add tests in our system.
Goal of the session: You will get these new microskills: * Verify results * Using Code Coverage * Using Mutation Testing * Using your Editor effectively
Intended audience: Jan,Marieke,Leo
Expected experience: General coding knowledge in either java or javascript.
Session Type: 90 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: https://github.com/supernelis/workshop-renovating-legacy-codebase
Have you inherited a horrible legacy system to maintain? Are you scared to introduce bugs touching it? Have you done a first attempt to add automated tests (e.g. with selenium and cucumber) but they keep on failing and don’t lead to the expected return on investment?

Legacy systems often have a catch-22: changing the system is risky without good tests, but before you can add tests you need to change the design.

In this session you will see how to approach a legacy systems adding effective and valuable automated tests to allow a refactoring. After a brief introduction you will tryout two techniques.

The first technique that we will explore has very ancient roots. In the Middle Age, the only way to have new copies of a book was to use scribes. They had to manually copy the book and then check it with the original version produced by the Master. Amazingly we will see how we can use the same approach, called Golden Master, to add tests in our system.

The second techniques that we will explore are for testing your tests, i.e. which metrics you need to put in place to see if your tests are sufficient. You can see if your test suite is effective by using both code coverage and mutation testing.

The session will have a limited presentation and the attendees will have the opportunity to have an extensive hands-on, learning these techniques by doing.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo

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The Product Owner, the great facilitator

What’s is your product owner doing all day long? What do others expect from your product owner?

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

We often hear about the Product Owner’s role, about how they actually own the vision and the product.

What kind of anti-patterns do you know in the Product Owner role? What skills are required to become a great Product Owner? What roles & positions (stances) do you take a Product Owner? In this interactive workshop you’ll also learn about a leadership model which we use to explore different stances of a role.

Goal of the session: 1/ learn about anti-patterns of product owner 2/ learn about different leadership stances as a product owner
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke Hank, Ellen,
Expected experience: some knowledge about agile product ownership
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
We often hear about the Product Owner’s role, about how they actually own the vision and the product.

What kind of anti-patterns do you know in the Product Owner role? What skills are required to become a great Product Owner? What roles & positions (stances) do you take a Product Owner? In this interactive workshop you’ll also learn about a leadership model which we use to explore different stances of a role.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


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20

Go Fish!

A philosophy for being an outstanding team member.

Steven Deneir
& Jeremy Naus

Bringing change to teams start with yourself.If your attitude is open for play, for being in the now, you will make their day.

Play and fun have a place in the business world. Happy people are more productive, so come on in and learn how the four pillars of the FISH! philosophy can help you make that change.

The fun is about to start.

Goal of the session: Change starts with yourself. If your attitude is open for play, for being in the now, you will make their day.
Intended audience: Ellen, Hank, Joke, Vincent, Georges, Philippe, Bram, Leo, Marieke, Jan
Expected experience:
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
We’ve heard it all before:

– “A self-organizing and cross-functional team.”

– “Values embodied and lived by the team.”

– “The pillars of empiricism come to life and build trust for everyone.”

Feels like a walk in the park. Doesn’t it?

There are loads of studies done by (famous…?) social psychologists on the topic of team work, and how teams become great. Honestly, the titles only bore me to death so I never read one.

Yet when I heard about the “Fish! Philosophy” I took the gamble.

And it proved to the right gamble:

– easy to read

– easy to understand

– fun

– engaging

– …

Really, you should check this out… If a team of fish resellers can do it to the level that tour busses stacked with tourists are interested in it… well…

So come on in and let’s have some fun together. In a playful way we’ll learn about the key pillars of this philosophy, and experience them.

You will experience that while playing we’ll make your day. By being there and choosing your attitude you’ll have a fun time, all the while learning what Fish! is.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Focus, focus and more focus to deliver value

from a project organization towards a value-driven Organization

Ziryan Salayi

in an environment in which teams are Agile, the rest of the organization is steered by at least 5 steering committees.

I will share my experience on how I helped the Product Owner to gain focus and reduce the number of initiatives from the backlog. From 34 approved initiatives by several steering committees getting back to 7 initiatives to work on for two teams for the next quarter.

I will share the steps I have taken, the hurdles I have overcome and the compromises I had to take to get everybody along in this process.

We will also have hands-on experience with some of the practices I have used. One of them is the priority quadrant I used to make the added value of each project visible.

Goal of the session: examin some guidelines and practices to help Product Owners and organization to focus on value creation
Intended audience: leo, bram, george,vincent, joke, ellen
Expected experience: Product Ownership
Session Type: 60 min short experience report (30 min)
in an environment in which teams are Agile, the rest of the organization is steered by at least 5 steering committees.

I will share my experience on how I helped the Product Owner to gain focus and reduce the number of initiatives from the backlog. From 34 approved initiatives by several steering committees getting back to 7 initiatives to work on for two teams for the next quarter.

I will share the steps I have taken, the hurdles I have overcome and the compromises I had to take to get everybody along in this process.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Avengers : a devops sysops team from autonomy to self-direction at oui.sncf

Rising the 4 levels of autonomy

Luc Taesch
& [email protected]

Diego will present how he created the Avengers, a devops-sysops team that built the software factory of oui.sncf ( online train tickets, 14Bn€ TurnOver, 3rd largest French web player) .

How to raise to raise the 4 levels of autonomy for a team ?.

From creation of scattered members on 3 sites, to self-organization and then self-management in shared governance, where the team creates its vision and roadmap with its community ( a thousand developers).

And yet, some team members were not in favour of autonomy. The coaching went through the 4 levels of autonomy in 12 months.

This included agile, sociocracy, spiral dynamics, nvc, liberating structures, peer psychological support, and innovative techniques and models, which will be shared.

Goal of the session: understand the systemic conditions of autonomy, and create a progressive pedagogy to build them
Intended audience: Ellen, Joke, vincent, georges, bram, Leo, Marieke,
Expected experience: medium
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Materials: tbd after acceptance (an article summarizing the experience, models descriptions, including maturity model, and resilience model
Diego will present how he created the Avengers, a devops-sysops team that built the software factory of oui.sncf ( online train tickets, 14Bn€ TurnOver, 3rd largest French web player) . And how Luc helped him to raise the 4 levels of autonomy. From creation of scattered members on 3 sites, to self-organization and then self-management in shared governance, where the team creates its vision and roadmap with its community ( a thousand developers). And yet, some team members were not in favour of autonomy. The team, outside of the hierarchy, reported directly to the CODIR members who were only sponsors, and only validated the budgets on the basis of major options, 1 hour every 6 months. The coaching went through the 4 levels of autonomy in 12 months. This included agile, sociocracy, dynamic spiral, cnv, liberating structures, peer psychological support, and innovative techniques and models, which will be shared. Today Diego leads the practice, which helps the other teams to climb the same steps, because the approach and structure is meant to be replicable.
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
40

Legacy Code Refactoring with the Golden Master and the Mikado Method

Discover 2 techniques to refactor untested legacy code during this live coding kata.

Philippe Bourgau

“Yesterday, I continued my refactoring. I should be done today…” Have you ever been in this situation of repeating this same message over and over in for days and days?

In a developer’s day to day work, refactoring (untested) legacy code remains one of the most tricky and complicated tasks. “Don’t touch it!” is the most widespread recommendation. Unfortunately, we spend at least 80% of our time in ‘Legacy’. Better be ready!

During this live coding kata, discover, with your own eyes, how to refactor untested legacy code with the golden master and the mikado method techniques.

Goal of the session: Learn enough about 2 practical and safe techniques to start refactoring legacy code
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Hank, Leo
Expected experience: Any developers (examples will be in Java, but easy enough to be understood by any developer)
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Materials: The few slides to the talk (most of it is live coding)
“Yesterday, I continued my refactoring. I should be done today…” Have you ever been in this situation of repeating this same message over and over in for days and days?

In a developer’s day to day work, refactoring (untested) legacy code remains one of the most tricky and complicated tasks. “Don’t touch it!” is the most widespread recommendation. Unfortunately, we spend at least 80% of our time in ‘Legacy’. Better be ready!

During this live coding kata, discover, with your own eyes, how to refactor untested legacy code with the golden master and the mikado method techniques. You’ll understand how:

  • The Golden Master can help you temporarily ‘snapshot’ the behaviour of a piece of code by asserting IOs
  • The Mikado Method avoids the tunnel effect by splitting large refactorings in a graph of small deployable steps
  • Both techniques reduce risks,
  • contribute to a sustainable pace,
  • complement each other for maximum effect
  • Although I’ll use Java, the techniques are adaptable to many language or contexts

Eager to take on Legacy refactoring? It start here 😃

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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max
50

Three little pigs. Blending Design Thinking with Agile for human-centred change at VRT.

Bart Vermijlen
& Sven Lardon

Design Thinking can be your next golden nugget. Why? It allows your team and stakeholders to focus on maximising end-user value in the most efficient and effective way. Learn what worked well at VRT and what didn’t from both a business as a team perspective.
Goal of the session: Inspiration for new tools and techniques
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Joke, Ellen
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Agile and Design Thinking share a lot: systems thinking, empiricism, iteration, human-centred,… But how can you bring them together in your day-to-day agile practice?

This session tells the story of a specific case at VRT Radio 1. It will also introduce the basic principles behind Design Thinking, catered to the world of agile. Allowing better focus on value for end-users, stakeholder alignement an prioritisation.

Starts with a couple of warm-up questions and a high speed mini-workshop in pairs simulating a full Design Thinking-cycle.

Featuring tools such as Jobs-to-be-done, Hamburger slicing, ideation workshops and many more. Followed by lessons learned based on the Three little pigs retrospective format.

Hosted by both a representative from business as the product owner from the agile team at VRT.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Per Beining

Per Beining

Twitter: @perbeining

Per is part of the team behind one of Denmarks leading company within the field of Agilily: Ugilic (www.ugilic.dk).

Per’s key skills are Agile project leadership and mentoring in IT environments. Working together with developers, business sponsors and management, he helps organizations implement Agile while considering existing culture, processes and governance (including PMO), and the organization’s Agile maturity.

Educating and training people and organisations in how to apply Agile and Scrum is also close to his heart. And how to create and work with requirements is one of his current main focus areas.

Per is a DSDM Certified APL Practitioner and Certified Scrum Master and Product Owner. He has many years experience using traditional approaches to project management and systems development, and is a Certified Prince2 Practitioner, Certified IPMA Level C project leader, and Certified ITIL Foundation Level practitioner.

Per started his career as a software developer (perl, java and HTML). He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Copenhagen Business School, and has solid experience in telecommunications, media, transportation & logistics, finance/banking, and the military.

Write to Per at [email protected] or call +45 40 308 307.


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Rikke Thomsen Kornby

Rikke Thomsen Kornby

I am a pro-active, curios and exploring networker and do’er, that uses my talent for gathering experts, thinkers, developers and administrators to build and improve digital services and processes. All in the area of Agile development, service design, design sprint, enterprise design and facilitation.

I believe in teams and team effort, whether it is within management, support, product development or IT, that one person can’t fix everything and that help is something you both ask for and give.


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Stanislava Potupchik

Stanislava Potupchik

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stanika/

Twitter: @p_stanika

Do you think it’s a long way from being a counselor in a kids camp to become a scrum master for development teams? I made this journey and I am happy with where I am now.

I work as a Scrum master at Quby (in Amsterdam), I provide serious games soft skills workshops and trainings as meetups and as events for companies, I speak at the conferences (oh no, that’s not true, I make people speak and play and interact while I am called a speaker).

My passion is to help people move so that they can make the world go round. I can listen and give feedback, asking questions that inspire people to challenge themselves more. Know yourself before you start changing, that’s my motto. So I strive for ultimate personal and corporate transparency and I invite you to work on that together.


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Robert van Lieshout

Robert van Lieshout

Website: http://www.pragmaticall.nl

Twitter: @robertvl

Robert is a compassionate agilist, coach and facilitator. With over 30 years of experience, he still has a lot to learn. His love for happy people and high standards have led him in many directions. As a result you can find him coaching individuals and teams, facilitating groups, as well as promoting BDD, TDD and pair programming.

Touched by the many people that have trusted him with their fears and challenges, he is currently exploring trust and psychological safety in more depth.

A good way to get Robert started is to offer him a beer or a board game.


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Linda van Sinten

Linda van Sinten

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/linda-van-sinten-29774918/

Twitter: @van_sinten

Linda is a creative and caring Agile Coach and Scrum Master. She is positive minded and always curious to learn new things and skills.

Passionate about puzzles, she takes this passion to her teams, where she constantly challenges them in situations where a solution seems impossible.

She is great at visualization and knows how to put a smile on people’s face.

Amazed by the results that she has seen through coaching sessions in a psychologically safe environment, she is determined to spread that knowledge so others can experience its effect as well.


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Koen Vastmans

Koen Vastmans

Website: https://scrumbansim.wixsite.com/simulation

Twitter: @Koen_V

I’ve been working in IT for almost 27 years. After many years of development, I moved to agile coaching and training which I did for about 6 years. About a year ago a joined a team of cloud native development where I focus on DevOps processes, but once agile coach always agile coach? Even though I am no full time coach anymore, I still share my experiences very often. My passion for learning new things and sharing what I learnt is my main driver.


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Sangeetha Sridhar

Sangeetha Sridhar, Agile Coach @ ING


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Marc Evers

Marc Evers

Website: http://www.qwan.eu

Twitter: @marcevers

Marc works as an independent coach, trainer and consultant in the field of (agile) software development and software processes. Marc develops true learning organizations that focus on continuous reflection and improvement: apply, inspect, adapt.

Marc organizes workshops and conferences on agile and lean software development, extreme programming, systems thinking, theory of constraints, and effective communication. Marc is co-founder of the Agile Open and XP Days Benelux conferences.

He knows how to combine his real-world experience with knowledge that is out there to create novel solutions. He likes to add games to highly-rated workshops, so participants have fun and learn from experience.


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[email protected]


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Thierry de Pauw

Thierry de Pauw

Website: http://thinkinglabs.io/

Twitter: @tdpauw

Thierry is a CI/CD advocate, lean software engineer and occasional speaker.

He is a jack-of-all-trades with a passion to help teams create meaningful software, having a keen eye for code quality and the software delivery process, from customer interaction to continuous delivery. Instead of balancing quality & delivery, he believes and practices that better quality is actually a way to more and better deliveries.

Currently, he is Engineering Lead at the fintech startup PaxFamilia.

Thierry is also founder of ThinkingLabs, with which on the side he helps organisations adopt Continuous Integration and/or Continuous Delivery.

This year Thierry organised the CITCON – Continuous Integration and Testing unconference in Ghent, Belgium.

He may be a little known for his presentation “Feature Branching considered Evil”.


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Zuzi Sochova

Zuzi Sochova

Website: http://sochova.com

Twitter: zuzuzka

Zuzana “Zuzi” Šochová is an independent Agile coach and trainer and a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) with more than fifteen years of experience in the IT industry. She started with agile and Scrum back in 2005, when she was implementing agile methods in the USA. From that time, she has been credited with agile transformation and implementation for many companies and teams around the world. By creating and sustaining agile leadership, Zuzi believes the worlds of work and life can be made happier and more successful.

Zuzi is a founder of the Czech Agile Association, and the world famous AgilePrague conference.

Zuzi was elected to the Scrum Alliance Board of Directors in 2017. She is an author of The Great Scrum Master: #ScrumMasterWay book (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Cohn)).

Web: http://sochova.com

Blog: http://agile-scrum.com

Twitter: @zuzuzka

LinkedIn: http://cz.linkedin.com/in/zuzka


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Ralph van Roosmalen

Ralph van Roosmalen

Website: http://www.agilestrides.com

Twitter: @raroos

Ralph believes people make all the difference in every project. The skills of people, how they work together and how they feel. Scrum, Kanban, eXtreme Programming, Management 3.0, these are just tools, ideas and/or frameworks that exist to help people.

He has been working in IT since 1997. He had different roles: from developer, tester, Scrum Master, Agile coach, lead, manager to VP. What he always liked most, however, was working with people to improve the processes and the environments they work in. He is an active member of the Agile community and shares his insights and knowledge by speaking at conferences and writing blog posts. He is specialized in recruitment, building (distributed) agile software teams and management 3.0.


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Marcel Blok

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcel-blok/

During the last 20 years Marcel has worked at a lot of different positions: developer, scrum master/coach, business analyst, product owner, architect, manager. In all jobs he always asks why are we doing this? Can’t we do better? And what he always discovers is that we can do better. At small scale or at large scale.


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Artur Margonari

Artur Margonari

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arturmargonari/

Twitter: @arturmargonari

Artur Margonari is passionate about Agile, which he applies daily in his personal life. He works as Agile Coach, Trainer and Facilitator at Wemanity Belgium and has more than 6 years experience in practicing and helping organizations to be more Agile, to form powerful teams and to deliver great products.

He is a board member of the Agile Consortium Belgium, a non-profit organization that offers an independent platform where Agile knowledge is created and shared and, by learning and sharing best Agile practices, we strive to inspire our members and guide them to become more effective. On top of that, he invests his free time to organize meetups, trainings and big conferences, such as Agile Tour Brussels.

His essence and way of life can be represented by Mahatma Gandhi’s saying: The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.

Hobbies & passions: guitar, ukulele & harmonica, archery, human being, martial arts, learning and traveling.


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Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?

Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?

Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Christiaan Verwijs

Website: https://theliberators.com

Twitter: @chrisverwijs

I enjoy igniting positive change in teams and organisations. It is my strong belief that people should be empowered to drive change themselves, rather than being told by management or consultants how to change.

My personal mission is to liberate the world from dehumanizing and demotivating workplaces by helping organizations find better ways to tap into the creativity, the intelligence and the wisdom of people. I feel that this is the best way forward in this world of complex work.

Based on my personal experience and my background in software engineering and organisational psychology, I have found both the Scrum Framework and Liberating Structures to be powerful ingredients here.


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Barry Overeem

Website: https://theliberators.com

Twitter: @barryovereem

As co-founder of The Liberators, I liberate organisations from outdated modes of working and learning. Bringing in fresh energy and creativity, I create space for everyone to be involved in shaping the future and make a positive impact.

As a Scrum.org trainer & steward and Liberating Structures facilitator I share my insights and knowledge by providing training, facilitating workshops, speaking at conferences and writing blog posts.


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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Website: http://www.warmolts-ict.nl

Twitter: @sannygr

Sandra Warmolts is an Agile coach, Continuous Deliver coach, scrum master, product owner and trainer in Agile, Scrum, Kanban, DevOps, Less and Lean product development, with 16 years of experience. The combination of software development and teamwork make her job the best in the world. She helps organizations transform to better ways of working together on the product with customers.

She’s mother of a 16 year old girl and 15 year old boy, lives with her husband and kids in Kropswolde (Groningen), loves to play tennis and go to conferences.


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Lilian Nijboer

Twitter: @llillian

Lilian has been active in the agile community for over 10 years as an agile coach, organisation and leaderships coach, trainer and conference organiser. With a background in, and over 20 years of experience in IT, communication and psychology she supports organisations and teams to find their purpose and improve their way of working (together), while having fun at the same time.


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Martin van Dijken

Martin van Dijken

Website: http://growingpassion.eu

Twitter: @sunsear

Software developer, agilist, maximizer, builder, freelancer.

My values have always centered around getting the greatest result out of the hours I spend working. Starting as a junior software developer, I was always interested in technologies that helped me and my team increase our output. During my long career as a developer, I learned more and more that the focus should first be on building the right thing. The way to achieve that is through interaction with the people around us meaning users, other developers, business owners, infrastructure teams etc. After leading and guiding the teams I was working in as a developer and Scrummaster, I’m now helping other teams as an agile coach.


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Ruud Rietveld

Ruud Rietveld

Website: http://trailblazers.nl

Twitter: @ruudriet

I am an Agnostic Agile Coach (and have some PSM-certifications), focussing on getting a team to self-organising. Working at Trailblazers, a young Dutch purpose-driven organization set up using Sociocracy 3.0.

50 years old, have a great wife, am father of a 17-year-old son. Playing (beach)volleyball, Dungeons & Dragons, reading fantasy and professional books, playing games.


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Barry Heins

Twitter: @barry_heins

Owner of EPIC Coaching.

Currently active as Agile Coach at FleuraMetz and as trainer for vaious companies. Also active a individual and team coach, blogger and speaker.

Barry has a wide range of experience in communication, sales, management, project management and obviously in Agile.

Barry has worked all sorts of companies ranging from MN (pension fund) to Coolblue (e-commerce).


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Ori Drory

Ori Drory

Ori is an Agile Specialist at Coolblue, the number one example when it comes to customer satisfaction in retail organisations.

Next to this he is a NLP certified (Practitioner and Master Practitioner) and DISC certified trainer for effective teamwork in modern organisations.


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Matteo Pierro

Matteo Pierro

Twitter: @matteo_pierro

Hi, my name is Matteo and I’m a Software Craftsman and a Technical Coach. eXtreme Programming practitioner and TDD lover, I’m very passionate about creating well crafted software that delivers high value to the customer.

I’m addicted to conferences and meetups. I love to share knowledge with people in order to improve myself and hopefully inspire other people.


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Nelis Boucké

Nelis Boucké

Twitter: @nelisboucke

Software crafter with a profound interest in defining environments where teams can thrive to build great product.

  • Experience with agile transformations, software architecture and technical excellence in both SME and corporate settings.
  • Focus on delivering results. Agile in itself is not a goal, but Agile principles help to deliver value in rapidly changing environments.
  • Experiences in assessing and setting up technical excellence to deliver quality products.
  • Worked with companies in the following domains: energy, logistics and automation, automated warehouse systems, tank terminals, public transport, municipalities and government administration, security, banking.


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Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Website: http://value-first.be

Twitter: vfrederik

I’m on a personal mission to transform organisations and the workplace and bring them into the 21th century, using modern-day (new) ways of working and leadership. Honestly, I am on a continuous discovery & exploration how to create a happy, productive, creative workplace where everybody feels good!

If you want to know more about my background, studies, certifications, experiences, interests … connect with me on http://linkedin.com/in/frederikvannieuwenhuyse/ and my professional activities, check https://value-first.be/

Happy to listen to you and reflect! How can I help you, today?

Frederik is also XP Days Benelux co-organizer and event organizer at the Agile Belgium meetup. My interests go very wide… agile/lean/lean-startup/leadership/sociocracy/coaching/facilitation/…


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Steven Deneir

Steven Deneir

Website: https://co-learning.be/users/stevendeneir

Twitter: @StevenDeneir

Teams become high-performing when working in a psychological safe environment and when they are truly engaged. I support them to get there.

Acting as a guide, facilitation, coaching, training and mentoring are my main instruments to enable leaders and teams to continuously improve their practices using an empirical processes control cycle of transparency, inspection and adaptation; i.e. the agile way.

My objectives?

Help others grow. Be it as a trainer, a Scrum Master or Agile Coach.

Me?

Optimist, enthusiasm, energy, passion, open mind, learn, Anja, Silken & Niels, french fries, walking

My tool-backpack to be used at the proper moment?

Scrum, LeSS, PRINCE2Agile, AgilePM, ADKAR, Innovation Games, Liberating Structures, The Responsibility Process, Management 3.0, Open Space Agility


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Jeremy Naus

Jeremy Naus

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @jermBE

As a former web developer I’ve seen projects go from great to right out disaster.

Then I learned about Scrum and it changed my world.

Today I’m active as scrum master, agile coach, graphic facilitator and/or trainer, to help companies transition to an agile way of working. I love to share my knowledge and experiences, so that we can all work in an environment where it is fun to be.

In my free time you can find me dressed up as knight, elf, troubadour, … while I’m larping away. Or on the run while I’m improving my time in the Antwerp 10 miles. Besides that I love hiking, karate, rowing, music (singing and playing), …

My toolbox consists of Scrum (PSM II, PSPO), LeSS, Visual Harvesting, Visual Facilitation, Responsibility Process, Sociocracy 3.0, Innovation games, Provocative Coaching, Management 3.0, Liberating Structures, …


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Ziryan Salayi

Ziryan Salayi

Website: http://www.ziryan-consulting.nl

Twitter: ziryansalayi

Ziryan is an experiences Agilist with over 10 years of experience in Agile organizations. He holds an Agile Coaching certificate, PSM-I, and PSM-II and is a PST candidate for Scrum.org. Furthermore, Ziryan holds a Bachelor degree in Business Information Technology, Majoring in Cross-Cultural and virtual teams. He also holds a Master degree in Business Administration on Change in Organizations. He has over 12 years of experience in IT-organizations in which he has fulfilled several roles, such as Business Consultant, Analyst, Tester, Scrum Master, Product Owner en Agile Coach.


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Luc Taesch

Luc Taesch

Website: https://www.taesch.com/

Twitter: @LucTaesch

Luc, ex-dev, ex-archi, ex-manager, ex-mc, is now praticing as an Enterprise Coach. He discovered agile in 1999. After a Personal development path of 30 years, including Meditation ( XP days 2013), NPL, NVC, Sociocracy, He blends these with Sociology, Spiral Dynamics, Liberating Structures, Restaurative circles, Resilience, and other Models to provide a systemic approach on individus, groups and organisations. And trying to keep things simple, but not simplistic. He is also operating self-development groups pro-bono. member of AFSCET ( French systemic association)


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[email protected]


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Philippe Bourgau

Philippe Bourgau

Website: http://philippe.bourgau.net

Twitter: @pbourgau

Continuous Refactoring Coach

Life is too short for boring stuff! I help software engineers to reach a productive and sustainable pace through continuous refactoring of their code and organization.


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Bart Vermijlen

Bart Vermijlen

Website: https://www.boxofbirds.be

Twitter: @bartvermijlen

Bart Vermijlen is Co-founder at Box of Birds, a Strategic Digital Design Studio based in Antwerp (Belgium).

After working for the government and in the cultural non-profit, Bart worked for almost 10 years as a digital producer in both Belgium and New Zealand. On brands such as Belfius, AXA, Playstation, Adidas, Nike, Toyota, Delhaize,…

Recently he has had Product Owner and Agile coaching roles at VRT, edding, Doctors without borders, … He is passionate about agile, scrum, design thinking, org design, service design and user experience.

He has guest lectured at Vlerick Business School, Ehsal Management School, Belgian Ad School, PXL Hasselt, Thomas More, Erasmus University College Brussels and Devine (Howest).

Bart is author of The Agile Agency, and a Certified ScrumMaster (CSM), Certified Agile Leadership (CAL1) and Certified DesignThinkers Academy.


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Sven Lardon

Strategic Advisor Radio at VRT

Sven started as an audience researcher at the VRT research department in 2000, where he developed expertise in both quantitative and qualitative research, with a focus on radio. As a researcher, Sven pioneered with daily passive measurement of listening and viewing behavior (PPM research) and coordinated a large-scale survey of needs and media moments of the Flemish media user (MEMO). Since 2013, he translated this expertise to a strategic level as an advisor to radio management and at this moment he takes on a coordinating role in the further digitization of VRT-ra(u)dio across various brands and platforms.


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Participants

Jan
Jan
Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That’s where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought “well, let’s give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it”. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it’s an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram
Bram has never missed an XP Days. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn’t know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn’t really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he’s relaxed, who knows what could happen? –Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges
Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he’s chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can’t be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they….?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don’t do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don’t fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants… He’s heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with “agile” methods, so he comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what “agile” can offer him. He doesn’t know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well… What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user’s lives. That’s one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this “agile” stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen
Ellen is an agile coach. She’s been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean… it doesn’t matter much to her. She’s more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions